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Monday, October 10
 

09:00

Yocto Project Developer Day (Registration and add'l Fee Required)
Additional cost of $249.00. To register for the Yocto Project Developer Day, please add the event to your ELC + Open IoT existing registration OR register separately.

Join the Yocto Project engineers to learn how to create custom-build Linux distributions for embedded devices, by using layers and recipes designed to resolve incompatibilities between different embedded system configurations. The Yocto Project Developer Day is taking place on October 10, 2016. This is one day before the Embedded Linux Conference Europe, so make your plans to arrive a day earlier and learn more about Yocto Project’s open source, high-quality infrastructure and tools.


Monday October 10, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Salon 16/17 Riga - Level 1

10:00

Liota Hackathon (Registration Required)
To register for the Liota Hackathon, please add the event to your ELC + Open IoT existing registration

Liota is an SDK and framework, and its purpose is to ease the development of gateway applications for moving data from devices to data-centers and performing commands from data-center components.

Many in the IoT community are settling on a three-tier architecture for the Internet-of-Things. The ‘Things’, IoT Gateways, and Cloud/Data-center. IoT gateways provide a useful de-coupling function between the machine world and the web/enterprise world. See the VMware CTO blog for a deeper discussion of this topic.


Monday October 10, 2016 10:00 - 17:00
TBA

17:00

Pre-Registration
Monday October 10, 2016 17:00 - 19:00
Hall Berlin Foyer - Ground Level
 
Tuesday, October 11
 

07:30

Breakfast
Tuesday October 11, 2016 07:30 - 09:00
Gallery, Level 1

07:30

Registration Open
Tuesday October 11, 2016 07:30 - 18:00
Hall Berlin Foyer - Ground Level

09:00

Keynote: Welcome Remarks & Announcements - Tim Bird, Program Chair
Speakers
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engineer, Sony Corporation
Tim Bird is a Senior Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. This group seeks to improve Linux for use in consumer electronics products. In this position, Tim directs technical initiatives, and encourages companies to participate in the open source community. Tim has been working... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 09:00 - 09:05
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

09:00

Real-Time Summit (Registration Required)
To register for the Real-Time Summit, please add the event to your ELC + Open IoT existing registration

The Real-Time Summit is organized by the Linux Foundation Real-Time Linux (RTL) collaborative project. The event is intended to gather developers and users of the PREEMPT_RT patch. The main intent is to provide room for discussion between developers, tooling experts and users.

View the Detailed Schedule.

 


Tuesday October 11, 2016 09:00 - 18:00
Hall Berlin E - Ground Level

09:10

Keynote: A Fireside Chat with Greg Kroah-Hartman, Linux Foundation Fellow
Moderators
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engineer, Sony Corporation
Tim Bird is a Senior Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. This group seeks to improve Linux for use in consumer electronics products. In this position, Tim directs technical initiatives, and encourages companies to participate in the open source community. Tim has been working... Read More →

Speakers
avatar for Greg Kroah-Hartman

Greg Kroah-Hartman

Fellow, Linux Foundation
Biography coming soon.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 09:10 - 09:30
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

09:35

Keynote: Breaking Barriers: Creatively and Courageously - Jelena Lucin, International Project Manager & Melissa Rancourt, Founder, Greenlight for Girls

In a society often diffused with preconceptions and norms, the greenlight for girls team will tell the story of how an initiative can grow from one email to a global organization in a few short years by breaking barriers, creatively and courageously.

 Greenlight for girls, asbl is an international organisation dedicated to inspiring girls of all ages and backgrounds by demonstrating just how fun & interactive the world of Science and Technology can be. With hands-on workshops and events led by role-models from different industries around the globe, we inspire and build the future talent pipeline of STEM leaders by encouraging young students to think about how their futures are full of possibilities and to realise their own individual and creative potential.


Speakers
avatar for Jelena Lucin

Jelena Lucin

International Project Manager & Science Adviser, Greenlight for Girls
As a scientist, educator and global Project Manager, her multi-faceted role with greenlight for girls, an organization that instills passion and creativity, takes on many dimensions - from coordinating events, leading project teams around the world to building relationships with major corporations and coming up with new and creative ways to promote learning through hands-on workshops in STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering and Mathematics). She... Read More →
avatar for Melissa Rancourt

Melissa Rancourt

Founder & Chairman, greenlight for girls
Engineer and Entrepreneur. Educator and Creator. | Melissa Rancourt is the Founder of the international non-profit organisation, greenlight for girls, which inspires girls in STEM studies & careers around the world. This organisation, very near and dear to her heart, was founded to address the issue of the declining or stagnant percentage of women in several STEM (science, engineering, technology & mathematics) fields. In just a few... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 09:35 - 09:55
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

10:00

Keynote: A Demonstration with Ubuntu - Maarten Ectors, VP of IoT, NG Networking & Proximity Cloud, Canonical
Speakers
avatar for Maarten Ectors

Maarten Ectors

VP of IoT, Canonical
Maarten Ectors is responsible at Canonical for Internet of Things, the next-generation of networking and cloud solutions that are in proximity of the user or at the edges of the network. Previously he was strategy director for cloud, big data and IoT. Maarten reports to Mark Shuttleworth, the founder of Canonical.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:00 - 10:20
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

10:20

Coffee Break
Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:20 - 10:40
Gallery, Level 1

10:40

Generic System for Safe Rootfs/Kernel Upgrades without Single-Point of Failure - Andreas Fenkart, digitalSTROM
The possibility of powerfail is the threat that puts thrill into FW upgrades. This talk will present a minimal kexec/initramfs system that solves the problems of fetching, verification(crypto) and actual upgrade in a machine/product agnostic way. In case of failure the system will retry, in the worst case fetch a default image from a known location. At no point a single failure will cause the loss of the device.

All major code paths are covered by unit tests. It works on legacy systems where space is scarce and the upgrade has to be streamed via https. Flashing time in the factory can be reduced by parallelizing easily. We also propose safe kernel upgrades by using drop-in-files based on the freedesktop boot loader spec. We learned to love that system to fine regressions during beta testing. Kernel up-/downgrades can be safely performed by anybody who knows to rename a file.

Speakers
AF

Andreas Fenkart

Software Engineer, digitalSTROM
I am an embedded software engineer and work as an application programmer for digitalSTROM. I also help with the BSP and maintain our delta against Linux kernel. I contributed to Linux drivers (omap_hsmmc/mwifiex) and prepared Linux for custom ARM boards (board startup).


Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:40 - 11:30
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

10:40

Kernelci.org Needs YOU! - Mark Brown, Linaro & Kevin Hilman, BayLibre
kernelci.org is a community service which does build and runtime testing of upstream kernels on a wide range of systems, primarily but not exclusively embedded ones. One of the most frequently asked questions about the service is how people can integrate systems in their labs into the system, this talk aims to show you how and provide an insight into how the service works.

We will begin by providing a brief overview of the kernelci.org system and what it does with a particular how boards are integrated before walking through setup of a test lab using the LAVA framework and finally showing how the two are connected.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Brown

Mark Brown

Kernel Working Geoup Technical Lead, Linaro
Mark is the maintainer of several subsystems in the Linux kernel, primarily for embedded systems, and has spoken at a number of conferences on related topics. He is the maintainer of the Linaro Stable Kernel, supporting production deployment of the latest features for ARM. Prior to working a Linaro he was the lead for Linux at Wolfson Microelectronics, supporting system integration both upstream and in leading consumer electronics products.
avatar for Kevin Hilman

Kevin Hilman

Kernel developer, BayLibre
Kevin has been a Linux user since 1994, and a kernel hacker since 1999 when he started writing drivers and working on kernel ports to new embedded platforms. He has been a driver/kernel developer for Equator Technologies, Texas Instruments, MontaVista, Linaro, and now works for BayLibre.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:40 - 11:30
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

10:40

Running an Undersea, Robotic Laboratory on a Fixed Energy Budget - Brent Roman, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
The Environmental Sampler Processor (ESP) performs a variety of chemical and genetic assays on samples it takes directly from its position moored 2 to 30 meters underwater. This Linux controlled "lab in a can" was developed to identify health hazards, such as toxic algae blooms, in hours rather than days or weeks.

Initially, energy consumed by the main microprocessor and radio communications limited the duration of deployments to about 30 days. Fitfully, over the course of the last 10 years, the system's hardware, software, firmware, and requirements have evolved to reduce energy use such that year long deployments have recently became possible. The greatest energy savings were achieved with a holistic approach that is readily applicable to many other remote (IOT) devices.

Speakers
BR

Brent Roman

Software Engineer, Monterey Bay Aquarium Research Institute
Like many budding geeks, I became fascinated by computers as a teenager in 80's, writing games in BASIC. By age 15, I somehow found myself working after school, for $3 hour, in a garage, next to a drill press, writing software in 8085 and Z-80 assembler to control concrete ready-mix plants. | | After graduating from the University of California at Santa Cruz, I worked a brief stint at the Santa Cruz Operation (SCO), where I discovered Linux... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:40 - 11:30
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

10:40

JerryScript: An Ultra-lightweight JavaScript Engine for the Internet of Things - Tilmann Scheller, Samsung Electronics
JerryScript is a lightweight JavaScript engine designed to bring the success of JavaScript to small IoT devices like lamps, thermometers, switches and sensors. This class of devices tends to use resource-constrained microcontrollers which are too small to fit a large JavaScript engine like V8 or JavaScriptCore.
JerryScript is heavily optimized for low memory consumption and runs on platforms with less than 64KB of RAM and less than 200KB of flash memory. Despite the low footprint, JerryScript is a full-featured JavaScript engine implementing the entire ECMAScript 5.1 standard. It is actively used in production and runs already on hundreds of thousands of smartwatches!
JerryScript is an open source project and has been released under the Apache License 2.0.
The talk will include a demo showing JavaScript code executing on top of JerryScript on a resource-constrained microcontroller.

Speakers
TS

Tilmann Scheller

LLVM Compiler Engineer, Samsung Electronics
Tilmann Scheller is a Principal Compiler Engineer working in the Samsung Open Source Group, his primary focus is on the ARM/AArch64 backends of LLVM. He has been working on LLVM since 2007 and has held previous positions involving LLVM at NVIDIA and Apple.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:40 - 11:30
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

10:40

The Little IoT Agent (liota) - Greg Bolella, VMware
The Little IoT Agent, liota, is an open-source project created by the VMware IoT team. We believe that for IoT to realize its promise the development platform for IoT gateways must be open, vendor-neutral, easily portable, permissively licensed, and provide support for meta-data (e.g., SI Units and IEEE 1451). Also, it must be easy to add support for the highly diverse set of sensors and actuators, data-center components, network transports, transformation modules, data orchestration components, local and remote databases, etc. Liota is a start in this direction and our hope is that its features begin to form a sound foundation for such a platform. Today liota has skeletal abstractions for the gateway hardware, the gateway OS, transforms, transports, data-center components, attached devices, metrics. (Alerts and actions coming soon). We have, at this time, completed (more or less) implementations for one data-center component (VMware’s vRealize Ops Manager), two transports (sockets and websockets), and metrics. We’ll discuss liota in detail, re-cap the liota hackathon held earlier this week, and look at some of the source developed there.

Speakers

Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:40 - 11:30
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

10:40

Zephyr Project: An RTOS to Change the Face of IoT - Geoff Thorpe, NXP Semiconductor
An increasing number of developers need a scalable, real­-time operating system designed specifically for small­ footprint IoT devices. It needs to be easy to use, and guided by the developers using it. An open source RTOS can't just be called "open" ­ it must live and breathe "the open source way." The Zephyr Project offers just that. Launched in partnership with the Linux Foundation, the Zephyr project is a truly open source solution focused on empowering community development. This talk will provide some provocative insights into IoT Security generally, as well as outlining the role the Zephyr project has to play.

Speakers
GT

Geoff Thorpe

Head of IoT Security, NXP Semiconductor, Microcontrollers


Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:40 - 11:30
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

10:40

IRQs: the Hard, the Soft, the Threaded and the Preemptible - Alison Chaiken, Peloton Technology
Interrupt handlers manage responses to asynchronous hardware events, keep time and queue deferred work. Hard IRQs are straightforward functions that read status and schedule a slower "bottom half". The difficulty lies with management of the deferred work. Soft IRQS and tasklets are two different mechanisms. Tasklets handle most deferred work, but network, timer and block tasks are managed directly by softirqs. Confusion comes from the realization that the softirq interface via ksoftirqd also manages tasklets. In the RT kernel, hard IRQs themselves run as preemptible threads. What precisely are softirqs and why does the kernel have them? How does handling of deferred work differ with the PREEMPT_RT_FULL kernel? These and related mysteries will be illustrated via results from tools like bpf, event tracers and mpstat that show how to detect IRQ scheduling problems in x86, arm and arm64.

Speakers
avatar for Alison Chaiken

Alison Chaiken

Kernel Engineer, Peloton Technology
Alison has been an automotive systems programmer and kernel engineer since 2011 and has worked at Nokia, Mentor Graphics, and Peloton Technology. In 2014-2015, she collaborated on-site with a customer in Germany. Alison has spoken at events including ELC and ELCE, USENIX, Automotive Linux Summit, Southern California Linux Expo and Maker Faire. She organizes the monthly meetings of the 1800+-member, 15-year-old Silicon Valley Automotive Open... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 10:40 - 12:30
Salon 7 - Ground Level

11:40

Long-Term Maintenance, or How to (Mis-)Manage Embedded Systems for 10+ Years - Jan Lübbe, Pengutronix e.K.
The technical side of how to build embedded Linux systems solved by now: Take the kernel, a build system, add some patches, integrate your application and you're done!

In reality though, most of the embedded systems we build are connected to the Internet and run most of the same software as servers or desktops.

Unlike these however, our systems are not regularly maintained an administrator and don't run a standard distribution.

In this presentation, Jan Lübbe will explain why apparently reasonable approaches to long-term maintenance fail and how to establish a sustainable workflow instead.

By mainlining required features early, aligning to the upstream support cycles and having a predictable maintenance and testing schedule, it is easy to respond to the inevitable (security) problems quickly and with controlled risk.

Speakers
JL

Jan Lübbe

Project Manager, Pengutronix e.K.
After building Linux smartphones with OpenMoko in 2008 and deploying open source GSM networks to cruise ships, Jan Lübbe joined Pengutronix in 2012 as a kernel hacker. Since then he helped customers from many different markets understand how Linux can solve their problems and how to benefit from mainline development. While not hacking at work, Jan builds atomic clocks and other cute embedded non-sense at the Stratum 0 hacker space in... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 11:40 - 12:30
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

11:40

Read-only rootfs: Theory and Practice - Chris Simmonds, 2net
Configuring the rootfs to be read-only makes embedded systems more robust and reduces the wear on flash storage. In addition, by removing all state from the rootfs it becomes easier to implement system image updates and factory reset.

In this presentation, I show how to identify components that need to store some state, and to split it into volatile state that is needed only until the device shuts down and non-volatile state that is required permanently. I give examples and show various techniques of mapping writes onto volatile or non-volatile storage. To show how this works in practice, I use a standard Yocto Project build and show what changes you have to make to achieve a real-world embedded system with read-only rootfs. In the last section I consider the implications for software image update. Expect a live demonstration

Speakers
avatar for Chris Simmonds

Chris Simmonds

Consultant, 2net
Chris Simmonds is a freelance consultant and trainer who has been using Linux in embedded systems for over 15 years. He is the author of the book “Mastering Embedded Linux Programming”, and is a frequent presenter at open source and embedded conferences, including the Embedded Linux Conference and Embedded World. He has been running training courses in embedded Linux since 2002 and has delivered hundreds of sessions to many well-known... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 11:40 - 12:30
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

11:40

Thwarting Unknown Bugs: Hardening Features in the Mainline Linux Kernel - Mark Rutland, ARM
Over the last few years, it has become increasingly apparent that bugs in the Linux kernel are being exploited on deployed systems. Even when these are fixed promptly upstream, the realities of deployment mean that systems and their users can remain vulnerable for long periods afterwards.

In response to this, effort has been placed into kernel hardening: modifying the kernel to reduce the attack surface, making entire classes of attack more difficult if not impossible. A number of hardening features have made it into the mainline Linux kernel, and while not a perfect defence, the use of these features can help to mitigate the impact of bugs not yet fixed or even known about.

This presentation will cover hardening features available in the mainline Linux kernel, what they protect against, and their limitations. Attendees can learn the benefits and trade-offs of these features.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Rutland

Mark Rutland

Kernel Hacker, ARM
Mark Rutland is a kernel developer at ARM Ltd, based in Cambridge, UK. Mark contributes to the arm and arm64 ports, working on boot infrastructure and firmware interfaces (e.g. ACPI, DT, PSCI, UEFI), working on both the kernel support code and the specifications themselves. Along with others he co-maintains Device Tree bindings and PSCI support.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 11:40 - 12:30
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

11:40

Leveraging IoT Biometrics and Zephyr RTOS for Neonatal Nursing in Uganda - Teresa Cauvel, Neopenda
The incredibly fast evolution of IoT Smart devices can save lives in Africa. At the heart of this revolution, the Zephyr Project with its open-source RTOS kernel can play a crucial role in enabling low-cost and low-power connected smart devices. In this presentation, Teresa Cauvel from Neopenda will take us through their journey developing a biometric IoT system to improve neonatal nursing in Africa. Teresa will describe how they started off from open-source components such as the Zephyr Project to architect and design the solution, develop the first prototypes and finally go in production.

Speakers
avatar for Teresa Cauvel

Teresa Cauvel

Co-Founder, Neopenda
Teresa recently earned an MS in Biomedical Engineering from Columbia University, 2016, and a BS in Bioengineering from Santa Clara University, 2014. Teresa and co-founder Sona Shah founded the global health tech startup Neopenda, and are developing a low cost wearable neonatal vital signs monitor aimed to help health workers in resource-constrained areas manage high volumes of critically ill babies and reduce preventable deaths. She is passionate... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 11:40 - 12:30
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

11:40

Run Your Own 6LoWPAN Based IoT Network - Stefan Schmidt, Samsung
With 6LoWPAN a technology has emerged that allows the use of IPv6 on small and tiny sensors. Specified by the IETF and implemented by IoT operating systems like Contiki, RIOT, Zephyr and Linux it helps to bridge the gap between well known IP based networks and small hardware with limited battery life and connectivity. It also became a base component of other specifications like ZigBee IP/NAN or Thread.
In this talk Stefan will explain quickly what makes 6LoWPAN interesting and how it is used today. From his experience of being one of the core developers of the linux-wpan and 6LoWPAN stack in the Linux Kernel he will show how you can setup a 6LoWPAN network.
The talk will provide a run through of setting up and deploying a 6LoWPAN based network. Explaining the needed background and protocol specifics at each step while focusing on the result.

Speakers
SS

Stefan Schmidt

Senior Software Engineer, Samsung
Stefan Schmidt is a FOSS contributor for over a decade by now. During this time he worked on different projects and different layers of the Linux eco system. From bootloader and Kernel over build systems for embedded to user interfaces. He was serving as technical steering committee member of OpenEmbedded during the merge with the Yocto project, helped porting a 2.6 kernel to some early smartphones and is the release manager of the... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 11:40 - 12:30
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

11:40

Soletta: Closing the IoT Development Gap - Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri, ProFUSION Embedded Systems
The IoT development has a gap: it's addressed as a traditional embedded system while market expectations require much more fast paced development and deployment cycles, including continuous software and hardware updates. The small number of highly skilled embedded systems engineers can't cover the broader spectrum of products; newcomers from Web and Phone applications struggle to understand the low level details and nuances. All in all it's very hard to reuse your code and knowledge across different systems!

Meet Soletta: a software framework designed to close that gap. From sensors to networking protocols with all that's needed to support products, such as update, crypto, persistence and more! The knowledge and code can be reused as those are exposed in an uniform API accessible from C/C++ and JavaScript, implemented for multiple Operating Systems: Linux, Zephyr, Contiki and RIoT.

Speakers
avatar for Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri

Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri

Owner, ProFUSION Embedded Systems
Software developer since 1991, Gustavo joined the open source community around 1998 and started to contribute actively to many projects in many areas and programming languages. He is passionate about interactive software, which led him to work at INdT with EFL (Enlightenment Foundation Libraries). Around 2008 he founded ProFUSION embedded systems to offer software services. In 2013 his company was acquired by Intel, being the base of OTC... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 11:40 - 12:30
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

12:30

14:00

Comparison of Linux Software Update Technologies - Matt Porter, Konsulko
The update of software in an embedded Linux system has always been an important part of any product. In the past, however, planning and design for software update was often an afterthought in system design. Further, software update mechanisms for embedded Linux products were typically implemented as ad hoc one-off projects within each product company. As the requirements for products have matured to include security updates at a frequent intervals, software update strategy has become a focal point of product development. This session will explore a number of different Linux software update technologies that are FOSS projects, comparing each for their strengths and weaknesses. In order to better understand the applicability of these technologies, we will also deep dive into both common and uncommon use cases that drive requirements for these software update mechanisms.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Porter

Matt Porter

CTO, Konsulko
Matt Porter is the CTO of Konsulko Group. At Konsulko, he works on design and development of software for the Linux kernel and other FOSS projects. Matt has contributed to a number of Linux related projects over his years of community involvement including the various part of the kernel, Debian, RapidIO, Beagleboard.org, and many others. Matt is currently working on GPGPU and eBPF hacks for Linux. Matt has spoken at previous Embedded Linux... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

14:00

Hardware Assisted Tracing on ARM with CoreSight and OpenCSD - Mathieu Poirier, Linaro
The CoreSight framework available in the Linux kernel has recently been integrated with the standard Perf trace system, making HW assisted tracing on ARM systems accessible to developers working on a wide spectrum of products. This presentation will start by giving a brief overview of the CoreSight technology itself before presenting the current solution, from trace collection in kernel space to off system trace decoding. To help with the latter part the Open CoreSight Decoding Library (openCSD) is introduced. OpenCSD is an open source library assisting with the decoding of collected trace data. We will see how it is used with the existing perf tools to provide an end-to-end solution for CoreSight trace decoding. The presentation will conclude with trace acquisition and decoding scenarios, along with tips on how to interpret trace information rendered by the perf tools.

Speakers
avatar for Mathieu Poirier

Mathieu Poirier

Kernel Engineer, Linaro
Mathieu held an array of linux-related position at various companies before joining Linaro 6 years ago. Since then he helped several organisation with their upstreaming efforts, worked on big.LITTLE technologies and more recently provided an open source solution for CoreSight trace collection and decoding in the Linux kernel.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

14:00

Herd Your Boards, Become a Farmer - Geert Uytterhoeven, Glider bvba
When broadening the range of embedded hardware you are developing for, one day your development boards will start outgrowing your desk, and a new solution is to be found: your personal local board farm.

While removing boards from your desk can reduce noise levels and surface clutter, it also brings some inconveniences, mostly related to the lack of direct manual access and visual feedback.

In this presentation, Geert will talk about organizing development boards in a board farm. He will discuss board farm requirements and challenges, and offer practical solutions for overcoming issues related to controlling, powering, monitoring, and automating boards in your farm.

All of this is based on the experience gained while designing and building his own board farm.

Speakers
JK

Jan Kiszka

Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG
Jan Kiszka is working as consultant and senior software engineer in the Competence Center for Embedded Linux at Siemens Corporate Technology. He is supporting Siemens sectors with adapting and enhancing open source as platform for their products. For customer projects and whenever his spare time permits, he is contributing to open source projects, specifically in the area of real-time and virtualization.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Salon 7 - Ground Level

14:00

IoTivity: The Open Connectivity Foundation and the IoT Challenge - Thiago Macieira, Intel
The IoTivity Project and the Open Connectivity Foundation (née Open Interconnect Consortium) are now around 2 years old. Both aim at providing the best-in-class solution for communication between devices in local networks, as well as between such devices and the cloud, with security and privacy concerns front and centre. This session will explain how IoTivity and the OCF are related to one another and how they are trying to solve the IoT challenge. It will also go over some of the past successes and failures of IoTivity and talk about the future plans, where the open source project is going, what's coming and how it's trying to make sure the Internet of Things doesn't become Islands of Things.

Speakers
avatar for Thiago Macieira

Thiago Macieira

Intel
Thiago Macieira holds a double degree in Engineering and an MBA. He has been involved in several Open Source projects for over 15 years and is an experienced C++ developer, having spent the better part of the last 10 years developing Qt and Qt-based software. In the last two years, he's also been working closely with C++ committee members in discussing and improving the suggestions for upcoming language features. He has been involved with many... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

14:00

New Wireless Daemon for Linux - Marcel Holtmann, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
This presentation is about a new 802.11 wireless daemon for Linux. It is a lightweight daemon handling all aspects around WiFi support for Linux. It is designed with a tiny footprint for IoT use cases in mind.

Speakers
MH

Marcel Hotmann

Help Desk, Intel
Marcel Holtmann is working at Intel's Open Source Technology Center. He is the maintainer of the BlueZ open source Bluetooth stack and has been working on Bluetooth technology since 2001.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

14:00

The Zephyr™ Project – An Updated Overview - Anas Nashif, Intel & Benjamin Walsh, Wind River

The Zephyr Project is a small, scalable, and real-time operating system for use on resource-constrained systems that support multiple architectures. Launched in partnership with the Linux Foundation, the Zephyr project is a truly open source solution focused on empowering community development. The goal of Zephyr is to allow commercial and open source developers alike to define and develop IoT solutions best suited for their needs.

Zephyr’s modularity allows it to run in as little as 8K of RAM, provides building blocks to enable many kinds of connectivity, sensing or control applications, to help create an IoT solution that meets all of your device needs, regardless of architecture. It is also embedded with powerful development tools that will, over time, enable developers to customize its capabilities.

In this session, we give a quick overview of the Zephyr Project’s features, functions and capabilities. We will also take a deep dive on the features added in the 1.5 release: MQTT, software updates, device management, USB Serial CDC support, FAT filesystem, direct memory access infrastructure, and a long list of new sensor drivers.

Additionally, we will take look at the kernel itself. We will discuss how we achieved such a small footprint RTOS and the implications for Zephyr RTOS developers. For those of you who are already familiar with Zephyr, we will go further and preview the new unified kernel where the nanokernel and microkernel configurations have been combined to deliver a smaller footprint, lower-latency RTOS that scales even more easily than before.


Speakers
avatar for Anas Nashif

Anas Nashif

Project Architect, Intel
avatar for Benjamin Walsh

Benjamin Walsh

Senior Member of Technical Staff, Wind River Systems
Technical lead on Zephyr kernel core and Zephyr core/x86/ARC maintainer. Veteran of several years of RTOS development, including kernel core, device drivers, AMP/multi-OS communication, build systems, etc. Previously VxWorks and WR Linux kernel development.



Tuesday October 11, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

14:00

Tutorial: Why NAND Flash Breaks Down - Arnout Vandecappelle, Essensium/Mind
Most embedded systems developers are aware that NAND flash isn't entirely reliable, and have heard of erase cycles, read disturb, retention time, paired pages, ECC, wear levelling etc. However, few understand why things go wrong. This talk will correct that. We start by looking at how a flash cell operates. This will give us an understanding of why the wrong bit may be read from it. Then we can look at how the faults can be mitigated. Finally we can think about how all this will evolve in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Arnout Vandecappelle

Arnout Vandecappelle

Sr. embedded software architect, Essensium/Mind
Arnout Vandecappelle is working since 2008 as Senior Embedded Software Architect at Essensium/Mind, providing consultancy on Linux and Open Source Software for Embedded Systems: driver development, debugging, system integration, etc. He has contributed to several open source projects, including buildroot and GStreamer. Previously he has been working for 10 years at IMEC where he held several different positions in research and software... Read More →



Tuesday October 11, 2016 14:00 - 15:50
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

15:00

Approaches to Ultra-Long Software Maintenance - Wolfgang Mauerer, Technical University Regensburg/Siemens AG
Mobile phones last for months before turning obsolete these days. Planes, trains, or power stations, to name a few, face possible lifespans of ten, twenty or even more years. Increasing amounts of open source software create commonalities between IT and industrial domains.

Drastic differences in innovation cycles translate into problems in software maintenance, but the long-term aspects also raise questions like how to ensure reproducibility of development environments over decades, or how to deal with product lines caused by hardware changes.

We discuss technological strategies for various different maintenance and architectural objectives, and evaluate approaches that are commonly used in industry. We highlight benefits and drawbacks of different technologies, and argue how processual approaches can help OSS communities and industrial users to better align their needs.

Speakers
WM

Wolfgang Mauerer

Professor/Senior Software Architect, Technical University Regensburg/Siemens AG
Wolfgang Mauerer is a senior key expert at Siemens Corporate Research, Corporate Competence Centre Embedded Linux, where he deals with establishing Linux in innovative and demanding industrial areas. He also serves as professor of theoretical computer science at the Technical University Regensburg, and is a member of the technical board of the Linux Foundation's newly founded civil infrastructure platform. His academic research deals with finding... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

15:00

Industrial I/O and You: Nonsense Hacks! - Matt Ranostay, Ranostay Consulting, LLC
Speaker will go into how to develop an Industrial I/O subsystem driver for an entirely new sensor, and how userspace HALs can process data with reduce system I/O than a pure "userspace driver". Some of the things that will be covered is iio channel consumers + definition, SW + HW triggers, and ring buffer interface. There will be some in-depth overview of the development API to implement a new driver, or add functionality to an existing iio driver.

Also will demo of several sensors using the various functionality of iio, including but not limited to hrtimer sw triggers, and buffered data to userspace HALs.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Ranostay

Matt Ranostay

Senior Software Engineer, Ranostay Consulting, LLC
Matt has worked in the Embedded Linux field in various roles for 10+ years at various companies including Embedded Alley, Mentor Graphics, and Intel's Open Source Technology Center.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

15:00

Introducing resinOS: An Operating System Tailored for Containers and Built for the Embedded World - Petros Angelatos & Andrei Gherzan, resin.io
resinOS is the latest open-source tool built by resin.io to enable the future of hardware with the tools of modern software. resinOS is a simple yet powerful operating system that brings standard Docker containers to embedded devices and works on a wide variety of device types and architectures. resinOS was born from the team’s experience deploying embedded containers across device types and has been battle-tested in production environments. The team will discuss how resinOS was built, highlight some of its key features, and share a roadmap for future development and contribution.

Speakers
avatar for Petros Angelatos

Petros Angelatos

CTO, Resin.io
Petros Angelatos is the co- founder and CTO of Resin.io which he founded in 2011 to improve the way code is deployed, updated, and maintained on remote Linux connected devices. As Chief Technology Officer, Mr. Angelatos directs and oversees all aspects of product development, including management of the technology team, R&D, design of system architecture and technical business development. Resin.io is a venture-backed company with customers... Read More →
avatar for Andrei Gherzan

Andrei Gherzan

Head of Devices, resin.io
Andrei Gherzan is the Head of Devices at Resin.io, a company which targets the improvement of the way code is deployed, updated, and maintained on remote Linux connected devices. He leads all the technical aspects of devices support and Resin operating system development.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Salon 7 - Ground Level

15:00

Build a Micro HTTP Server for Embedded System - Jian-Hong Pan
Apache HTTP Server, NGINX .. are famous web servers in the world. More and more web server frameworks come and follow up, like Node.js, Bottle of Python .., etc. All of them make us have the abilities to get or connect to the resources behind the web server. However, considering the limitations and portability, they may not be ported directly to the embedded system which has restricted resources. Therefore, we need to re-implement an HTTP server to fulfill that requirement.
I will introduce how do I use the convenience of Python to implement a Micro HTTP Server prototype according to RFC 2616/HTTP 1.1. Then, re-write the codes in C to build the Micro HTTP Server and do the automated testing with Python Unit Testing Framework. Finally, I combined the Micro HTTP Server with an RTOS and light the LEDs on an STM32F4-Discovery board.

Speakers
avatar for Jian-Hong Pan

Jian-Hong Pan

Engineer
Be an enthusiastic engineer called "Maker". Also, be the one who links the things to human in the mechatronic way. I use the Linux environment to develop the embedded system at home, including ARM, AVR ... solutions. I have been studying and trying to use the RTOS to build the interesting things connecting to the internet. I attended or gave talks in the open source user groups and conferences in Taiwan, and the slides could be found on the... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

15:00

Doing Bluetooth Low Energy on Linux - Szymon Janc, CODECOUP
This presentation will help audience to better understand how Linux supports fast changing and evolving technology as Bluetooth. It will provide comprehensive guide on BlueZ 5 stack architecture focusing on Bluetooth Low Energy support. Audience will also have good overview of how Linux can help building Internet of Things by supporting bleeding edge Bluetooth features like LE Connection Oriented Channels, BT6LowPAN, LE Secure Connections and more.

Speakers
SJ

Szymon Janc

Technical Lead, CODECOUP
Szymon Janc is an embedded software engineer. Develops embedded Linux systems since 2007. Linux and FLOSS enthusiast and contributor. Since 2009 works on Android based mobile platforms development mostly focused on Local Connectivity area. Recently involved in Bluetooth stack development for The Zephyr Project. In 2015 co-founded CODECOUP, a company providing support in Local Connectivity, Linux, Open Source and embedded software.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

15:00

OSS Remote Firmware Updates for IoT-like Projects - Silvano Cirujano Cuesta, Siemens AG
OSS Remote Firmware Updates for IoT-like Projects (Silvano Cirujano Cuesta, Siemens AG) - Doing remote firmware updates requires a back-end managing the firmware updates roll-out and a component on the devices installing them. When Silvano Cirujano Cuesta started evaluating the realization of such a system based on OSS he found one OSS project for each required funcionality, but they where completely decoupled: hawkBit to manage the updates roll-out and SWupdate to install them on the devices. In this presentation Silvano Cirujano Cuesta will give some insight into the decision to contribute to the project SWupdate to bridge the gap between both projects and the technical realization to get a remote firmware updates system fully based on OSS.

Tuesday October 11, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

15:50

Coffee Break
Tuesday October 11, 2016 15:50 - 16:10
Gallery, Level 1

16:10

Automated Testing Laboratory for Embedded Linux Distributions - Pawel Wieczorek, Samsung R&D Institute Poland
Shipping quality software always involves in-depth testing. In order to minimize time spent on repetitive actions, this task should be fully automated. Unfortunately this creates many problems which have to be solved to ensure stability of the whole process. During this talk Pawel will discuss key problems faced while building automatic testing infrastructure for Tizen operating system images. He will also present how Tizen release team dealt with such an uneasy task.

Both hardware and software presented in this talk is open (https://git.tizen.org/cgit/tools/testlab/sd-mux.git and https://git.tizen.org/cgit/tools/testlab/major.git) and can be easily used to build embedded software testing lab.

Speakers
PW

Pawel Wieczorek

Samsung R&D Institute Poland
Paweł Wieczorek is a senior student at Warsaw University of Technology. Since 2014 he works at Samsung R&D Institute Poland. Starting as an access control developer, Paweł contributed to the security framework of Tizen operating system. At that time, he introduced testing automation practices to Tizen and still actively develops automated test system. Currently he’s a Tizen Common release engineer. Speaker on Linux Autumn 2015... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 16:10 - 17:00
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

16:10

Open Source in Every Car with Automotive Grade Linux - Walt Miner, The Linux Foundation
Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a Linux Foundation Collaboration Project that develops a Unified Code Base open source distribution for use in automotive electronics.  The AGL Distribution increases innovation and reduces time to market for new applications to be included in the vehicle. Walt Miner will provide an update on the latest AGL activities including the Brilliant Blowfish release and ongoing work targeting the next release. Walt will show how and where developers can contribute to AGL.

Speakers
avatar for Walt Miner

Walt Miner

Linux Foundation, Linux Foundation
Walt Miner works for The Linux Foundation as the Community Manager for Automotive Grade Linux. Walt has over 25 years of embedded software development and management experience in the automotive, mobile phone, and defense industries. This includes 7 years working for Tier 1 Automotive suppliers (Continental and Motorola) and 6 years managing Linux architecture teams for mobile phones and automotive infotainment systems.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 16:10 - 17:00
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

16:10

Stuck in 2009 - How I Survived - Will Sheppard, Embedded Bits Limited
When developing Linux based products it's desirable to use the latest version of the Linux kernel - however this is not always possible. In this presentation Will Sheppard will enlighten you with his experiences in developing a product based on a 2.6.28 kernel. Throughout the presentation he will share with you the reasons why you can be stuck with an old kernel, the issues this causes and the surprising and unexpected benefits that also arise. The presentation will also give you an indication as to how far the kernel has developed since 2009 and perhaps some hope if you too are also stuck working in the past.

Speakers
WS

Will Sheppard

Embedded Linux Software Engineer, Embedded Bits Limited
Will Sheppard is an embedded Linux software engineer at Embedded Bits Limited - a provider of embedded Linux professional engineering services. His unbounded passion for understanding everything and the challenges presented by his customers has given him in-depth knowledge in a wide range of areas surrounding tool-chain, kernel and driver development, optimisation and video technologies on a variety of hardware platforms.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 16:10 - 17:00
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

16:10

How to Build a Distributed Serverless Polyglot Micro Services IoT Platform Using Docker and OpenWhisk - Kalonji Bankole, IBM
When people aren’t talking about VMs and containers, they’re talking about serverless architecture. Serverless is about no maintenance. It means you are not worried about low-level infrastructural and operational details. Event driven serverless platform is a great use case for IoT.

In this talk we will detail how to build a distributed serverless, polyglot, microservices framework using open source technologies like

1. Consul: Tool for service discovery and configuration. Consul is distributed, highly available, and extremely scalable.
2. Kafka: A high-throughput distributed messaging system.
3. StatsD/ELK/Graphite: For statistics, monitoring and logging
4. OpenWhisk: Open source distributed compute service to execute application logic in response to events
5. Docker: To run event driven actions
6. Ansible and BOSH: to deploy the serverless platform

Speakers
KB

Kalonji Bankole

Software Engineer


Tuesday October 11, 2016 16:10 - 17:00
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

16:10

Improving System Configuration for Zephyr and Beyond - Andy Gross, Linaro
SoC Vendors, board vendors, software middle layers, scripting languages, all need to have access to system configuration information (pin mixes, what sensors are on a system, what amount of memory, flash, and so forth).  We need a means to convey this in a vendor neutral mechanism but also one that is friendly for Cortex-M/constrained footprint devices.  This session will discuss the topic with regards to Zephyr, how system configuration is conveyed today, what changes we see needed to Zephyr, and the progress on a common definition format and tooling associated with it.

Speakers
AG

Andy Gross

Kernel Developer, Linaro
I work for Linaro as a kernel developer. My current project is IOT related, specifically improving board configuration and device description for Zephyr. I am also the Linux kernel maintainer for the Qualcomm SoC.



Tuesday October 11, 2016 16:10 - 17:00
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

16:10

OCF for Resource-Constrained Environments - Kishen Maloor, Intel Corporation
The IoT will be connected by smart edge devices with pertinent hardware having resource constraints. Such devices will execute in an environment defined by a selection of embedded OS, network stack, I/O and network layer/radio capabilities, all for which there are many options. Frameworks for standards based IoT are therefore confronted with the challenge of providing a consistent and maintainable codebase to employ across a diversity of deployments while staying lightweight.

This technical talk will present a new open-source and small-footprint implementation of the OCF (Open Connectivity Foundation) standard for resource-constrained environments. It will provide an overview of its architecture and design choices and how they address the aforementioned challenges. It will also do a code walk through of a simple OCF application. The presenter is the lead developer of this project.

Speakers
KM

Kishen Maloor

Senior Software Engineer, Intel Corporation
Kishen Maloor is a Senior Software Engineer at Intel Corporation. He has contributed to several research initiatives at Intel ranging from middleware for processing high frequency sensor data for Context Aware Computing to predictive analytics pipelines, developing expertise in Machine Learning and Natural Language Processing along the way. He now works at the Intel Open Source Technology Center and contributes to initiatives lead by the Open... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 16:10 - 17:00
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

16:10

Tutorial: Bootstrapping the Partitioning Hypervisor Jailhouse - Jan Kiszka, Siemens AG
The best way to understand a new technology is to try it out: This tutorial will give a detailed introduction into bootstrapping the partitioning hypervisor Jailhouse on an x86 and an ARM/ARM64 board. The goal is to have Jailhouse running at the end on both real targets, hosting multiple Linux systems as well as bare-metal or classic RTOS instances.

Unlike full-featured enterprise or desktop hypervisors, Jailhouse is rather minimalistic in features, configuration interfaces and also error reporting support. Therefore, the tutorial will walk through typical traps and pitfalls, explaining tricks how to avoid them or detect and resolve them in own setups.

Speakers
JK

Jan Kiszka

Senior Key Expert, Siemens AG
Jan Kiszka is working as consultant and senior software engineer in the Competence Center for Embedded Linux at Siemens Corporate Technology. He is supporting Siemens sectors with adapting and enhancing open source as platform for their products. For customer projects and whenever his spare time permits, he is contributing to open source projects, specifically in the area of real-time and virtualization.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 16:10 - 18:00
Salon 7 - Ground Level

17:10

ARM64 SoC Linux Support Check-List - Gregory Clement, Free Electrons
The ARM64 support in the kernel is mature, and we see more and more ARMv8 based SoCs being supported in the Linux kernel. It is now time to make the checklist of all what should be done in order to add the support for a new ARM64 SoC into the kernel. This talk will be an update of the talk made in early 2013 about ARM SoCs, with the addition of ARM64 specifities and various updates on the common parts between ARM32 and ARM64.

Speakers
avatar for Gregory Clement

Gregory Clement

Embedded Linux Software Engineer, Free Electrons
Gregory Clement is an embedded Linux engineer and trainer at Free Electrons since 2010. He has 15 years of on the field experience in porting and operating embedded Linux on many hardware architectures. He is currently involved in the integration of Marvell Armada 370/375/38x/39x/XP and the new ARM64 37xx/7K/8K SoC support in the mainline Linux kernel, acting as co-maintainer for the mvebu ARM sub-architecture (which includes the orion5x... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 17:10 - 18:00
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

17:10

Open Source, Encryption, Export and the New Compliance Frontier - Mark Gisi, Wind River Systems

The percentage of Open Source Software (OSS) that commercial software solutions are composed of is growing rapidly. It is not uncommon for Linux and other OSS components to represent the lion share of the software running on an embedded device. In recent years a lot of attention and effort has gone into developing OSS license compliance best practices. Another area given less attention yet continues to grow in importance is software export compliance. Although different governments have different regulations for software, what's universal is that software export compliance centers on the use of encryption software. It is often difficult to answer questions about the existence or use of encryption software for OSS that a developer uses (but did not write). We discuss best practices used to identify encryption in software, and open source tools that can assist with the task.



Speakers
avatar for Mark Gisi

Mark Gisi

Senior Intellectual Property Manager, Wind River Systems
Mark Gisi, Directory of Intellectual Property and Open Source at Wind River Systems (an Intel subsidiary), has been responsible for managing Open Source policies, processes and programs for the past 10 years. Mark has extensive experience managing the use of open source software to both maximize ROI and mitigate risk. That includes managing Open source software to go beyond reducing costs such as: accelerating innovation; fostering internal... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 17:10 - 18:00
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

17:10

Survey of Open Hardware 2016 - John Hawley, Intel
This is a generalized talk where we'll generally compare, contrast and discuss various things that have happened in the last year regarding Open Hardware. In 2016 this will cover things that happened at the last OSHWA meeting, various new devices that are on the market, and generally focus on devices capable of running and operating system, and not micro-controllers.

Speakers
JH

John Hawley

Open Hardware Technical Evangelist, Intel - OTC / MinnowBoard
John 'Warthog9' Hawley led the system administration team on kernel.org for nearly a decade. His other exploits include working on Syslinux, OpenSSI, a caching Gitweb, and patches to bind to enable GeoDNS. He's the author of PXE Knife, Boot Boot, as well as SyncDiff(erent) a state-full file synchronizer and file transfer mechanism. He currently woks for Intel working on Open Hardware, and the Minnowboard. In his free time he enjoys cooking... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 17:10 - 18:00
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2
  • Experience Level Any

17:10

Apache Mynewt Overview - Sterling Hughes & James Pace, Runtime
Apache Mynewt is a community-driven, permissively licensed open source initiative for constrained, embedded devices and applications. The emergence of the IoT is proving that anything that can be connected will be. Many of these devices—wristbands and wearables, lightbulbs and locks--must be operated for long periods of time, but are constrained in terms of power, memory, and storage. Apache Mynewt addresses these constraints while remaining hardware agnostic. Apache Mynewt includes the world’s first controller-level open source Bluetooth Low Energy for microcontrollers.

Apache Mynewt has 4 main collaborative goals:
  • A foundational RTOS and embedded middleware such as boot loaders, file systems, and time-series data support;
  • Solid networking protocol stacks for secure, efficient communications with constrained devices;
  • Simple image and configuration management and instrumentation for ongoing diagnostics, whether at the workbench or in mass deployment;
  • Modularity and easy composability to build an optimized image.

Speakers
SH

Sterling Hughes

CTO, Runtime
JP

James Pace

CEO, Runtime
Runtime is an early stage company providing significant contributions to open source for the IoT / embedded community. Apache Mynewt, an incubation stage project under the Apache Software Foundation, aims to provide a composable OS and development framework for embedded developers everywhere! Apache Mynewt includes the world's first open source BLE stack (controller level) for devices with MCUs.



Tuesday October 11, 2016 17:10 - 18:00
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

17:10

Flow Based Programming Applied to IoT Development - Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri, ProFUSION Embedded Systems
IoT software must beheave well in a dynamic environment and deal with many concurrent inputs and outputs. In code this often translates to multiple threads and synchronization primitives, or an event-loop and callbacks; both are error prone and demand hard to find expertise and are time consuming to get right. These were seen in Linux world for both servers and desktops, now the problem remains for Internet of Things.

The Soletta Project, a software framework for creating IoT devices, identified this as a major pain point for its users and investigated programming models that could solve the problem. The result is an old concept that started to regain traction: Flow Based Programming (FBP).

This presentation will introduce the audience to FBP and show real-life benefits. The Soletta implementation will be used as reference, showing it can scale down to microcontrollers.

Speakers
avatar for Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri

Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri

Owner, ProFUSION Embedded Systems
Software developer since 1991, Gustavo joined the open source community around 1998 and started to contribute actively to many projects in many areas and programming languages. He is passionate about interactive software, which led him to work at INdT with EFL (Enlightenment Foundation Libraries). Around 2008 he founded ProFUSION embedded systems to offer software services. In 2013 his company was acquired by Intel, being the base of OTC... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 17:10 - 18:00
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

17:10

Linux+Zephyr: IoT Made Easy - Pantelis Antoniou, Konsulko Group
Linux and Zephyr are two Open Source operating systems that are seemingly targeted to different problem areas. I'm going to present how they complement each other in a way that makes building next generation IoT systems easy. The biggest problem with IoT devices is how device cost is a crucial factor, and that in turn requires parts (especially flash and uCs) that are relative expensive. IoT systems require network connectivity, cloud and app UIs and much more. In those cases Linux is a good fit when running on mains power.
Using a Linux gateway controlling Zephyr IoT nodes makes perfect sense and I will present exactly how this is possible by a novel Linux sensor bus remote access solution that cuts down on the software stack requirements on the Zephyr IoT node.

Speakers
avatar for Pantelis Antoniou

Pantelis Antoniou

Kernel Engineer, Konsulko Group
Pantelis Antoniou has been an active Linux kernel developer for more than 14 years, working for companies like Texas Instruments, Mentor Graphics and NVIDIA. He is a founder and senior staff software architect at Konsulko Group. Having brought many Linux based products to market, at Konsulko Group he gets to make Linux play nice with cars. He has already been a speaker at a number of previous ELC's. His current interests are planting Device Trees... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 17:10 - 18:00
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

18:10

BoF: Linux Device Performance Framework - Michael Turquette, BayLibre
Complex system-on-chip processors provide performance levels for their devices and peripherals. The same chips also provide interconnects with performance knobs connecting these devices. For years, Linux has not provided a way to express the relationship between a device and its performance states, nor a uniform method for drivers to change these states. There are many solutions to this in downstream vendor trees. Let's fix that.

The purpose of this BoF is to start a discussion around the topic with a wide audience, solicit feedback on the currently proposed approach and move forward with consensus.

This BoF will discuss the types of performance states that need to be modeled, existing Linux driver frameworks that can be re-used, new code that needs to be written and how Device Tree plays a role. Will we write a new DVFS or Interconnect Framework? Attend and find out!

Speakers
MT

Michael Turquette

Chief Executive Officer, BayLibre
Mike is an embedded Linux expert who has worked at a large semiconductor manufacturer, an open source non-profit, a too-good-to-be-true Silicon Valley start-up and as an embedded Linux consult. He has brought up new silicon, developed power management for complex system-on-chip processors, ported Android to a lot of different platforms and built some weird and cool products powered by Linux. Mike also authored and co-maintains the Common Clock... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 18:10 - 19:00
Salon 7 - Ground Level

18:10

BoF: MinnowBoard - John Hawley, Intel
A simple meet, greet and talk about the cool things people are doing with MinnowBoard and MinnowBoard MAX. We'll likely discuss everything from robotics to UAVs, industrial systems and possibly even data centers and clustering.

Speakers
JH

John Hawley

Open Hardware Technical Evangelist, Intel - OTC / MinnowBoard
John 'Warthog9' Hawley led the system administration team on kernel.org for nearly a decade. His other exploits include working on Syslinux, OpenSSI, a caching Gitweb, and patches to bind to enable GeoDNS. He's the author of PXE Knife, Boot Boot, as well as SyncDiff(erent) a state-full file synchronizer and file transfer mechanism. He currently woks for Intel working on Open Hardware, and the Minnowboard. In his free time he enjoys cooking... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 18:10 - 19:00
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

18:10

BoF: Open Source Project to Update Linux Devices Over-the-Air (OTA): Mender.io - Ralph Nguyen, Eystein Stenberg & Marcin Pasinski, Mender.io
Speakers
RN

Ralph Nguyen

Community Development, Mender.io
avatar for Eystein Stenberg

Eystein Stenberg

CTO, Mender.io
Eystein Stenberg has over 7 years of experience in security and systems management as a developer, support engineer, technical account manager, product manager and now as a CTO. He has been in the front line of some of the largest production environments in various roles and has in-depth knowledge of the challenges in systems security in a real-world context. Eystein has spoken at various conferences, including Embedded Linux Conference, Embedded... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 18:10 - 19:00
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

18:10

BoF: Small Business - Andrew Murray, Embedded Bits
Creating and growing a small Linux consultancy business is full of challenges. Whether you're an employee stepping out of employment into the world of contracting, a 'one-man-band' wishing to grow beyond oneself or a small business looking to grow into a stable and mature business with future prospects - this BoF will provide solutions, ideas, encouragement and hope though discussion of these challenges and the sharing of experiences with like-minded individuals/engineers. Such challenges include finding business, managing limited resource, keeping a work/life balance, taking risks and keeping everyone happy (including yourself!). Andrew Murray will also share his experiences on his journey from employee to director of a small and rapidly growing business.

Speakers
AM

Andrew Murray

Embedded Bits
Andrew Murray is an embedded Linux software engineer at Embedded Bits Limited - a provider of embedded Linux professional engineering services. His day-to-day role fulfils his passion for learning and provides him with plenty of embedded Linux experience including kernel and embedded applications development on a variety of platforms. Andrew has reduced the cold boot time of countless real world products that use embedded Linux and produced a... Read More →


Tuesday October 11, 2016 18:10 - 19:00
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

18:10

BoF: Yocto Project & OpenEmbedded - Jeff Osier-Mixon, Intel Corporation/Yocto Project
Got a question, comment, gripe, praise, or other communication for the Yocto Project and/or OpenEmbedded? Or maybe you'd just like to learn more about these projects and their influence on the world of embedded Linux? Feel free to join us for an informal BoF.

Speakers
avatar for Jeff Osier-Mixon

Jeff Osier-Mixon

Open Source Community Engineer, Intel Corporation / Yocto Project
Jefro works at Intel Corporation as the community manager for the Yocto Project. He has been involved in embedded Linux for many years, and regularly speaks at Linux conferences worldwide.


Tuesday October 11, 2016 18:10 - 19:00
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any
 
Wednesday, October 12
 

08:00

Breakfast
Wednesday October 12, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Gallery, Level 1

08:00

Registration Open
Wednesday October 12, 2016 08:00 - 17:20
Hall Berlin Foyer - Ground Level

09:00

Building a Bards Farm: Continuous Integration and Remote Control - Antoine Tenart & Quentin Schulz, Free Electrons
At Free Electrons, many engineers are maintainers for ARM platforms and we cooperate with several ARM processors vendors. Thus, we have a strong interest in kernel continuous integration to detect regressions early. With this in mind, we decided to build a boards farm to contribute to KernelCI project which is a build and test automation tool for upstream

Linux kernel trees. Its infrastructure is designed so that anyone willing to contribute can add a farm, with its own boards, to build and test Linux kernels on a large variety of platforms and boards.

This talk will describe the Kernel CI goals and infrastructure and how it communicates with our farm using LAVA. We will then give a feedback on how we designed our boards farm and present its second use case: remote control of boards.

Speakers
avatar for Quentin Schulz

Quentin Schulz

Engineer, Free Electrons
Quentin joined Free Electrons in mid-2016 after spending a 6-months internship designing, building and integrating a farm to Kernel CI.
AT

Antoine Tenart

Free Electrons
Antoine is an engineer at Free Electrons since 2014 where he has been working mostly on ARM platforms. He contributed to the support of Marvell Berlin SoCs in the upstream kernel.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2
  • Experience Level Any

09:00

Introduction to Realtime Linux - Jan Altenberg, linutronix GmbH
Linux became the fastest growing platform in the embedded sector. One reason for this success is the huge number of supported hardware platforms. In addition it became very easy to get hard realtime capabilities to Linux. The PREEMPT_RT patch became the de-facto standard for Linux and realtime. It is available for every second kernel release and will be included in the mainline kernel in the near future. This talk gives an overview of the history of realtime Linux, the different approaches and the advantages of the PREEMPT_RT patch in comparison to other approaches. Furthermore it shows the latency results on a modern Cortex A9 platform for PREEMPT_RT and Xenomai (a so called dual-kernel approach). These measurements prove, that PREEMPT_RT is much easier to use and it can achieve latencies which are comparable to the latencies of dual kernel approaches like Xenomai or RTAI.

Speakers
avatar for Jan Altenberg

Jan Altenberg

open source trainer / project manager, linutronix GmbH
Jan Altenberg has more than 10 years experience in developing and maintaining Embedded Linux systems. He studied information technologies at the University of Cooperative Education in Stuttgart (Germany). From 2002 - 2006 he was involved in the OCEAN project, a european research project, which defined an open controller platform based on Realtime Linux and Realtime CORBA. Since 2007 he is working for Linutronix as an embedded engineer, trainer... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

09:00

LininoOS, LininoIO and ArduinoOS : A Suitable Ecosystem for Linux and MCUs - Arturo Rinaldi, Arduino.org
LininoOS is an OpenWRT-based distribution for Arduino YUN-like boards. It has about 3000 package built and available. LininoOS provides a fully writable filesystem with package management coupled with GPG signatures. The integration with LininoIO results in a complete Linux-based system for the IoT space.

LininoIO is a software framework able to expose microcontroller features (GPIO, Analog Converters, PWM, I2C, SPI) inside the microprocessor environment. Applications may be written using Node.js, Python, Bash and so on to have complete control of the board and all the attached devices and trasducers in a typical UNIX fashion.

ArduinoOS is a new graphical interface based on the OS.js framework. It has been designed to be the new user experience for LininoOS providing the main desktop functionalities (i.e. copy/paste, drag’n’drop, FS access) through the use of a simple browser.

Speakers
avatar for Arturo Rinaldi

Arturo Rinaldi

Software Engineer, Arduino.org
I'm an Electronics Engineer working in the ICT field. My studies concerned especially digital modulations and network protocols (i.e. TCP, UDP, 802.11) during my thesis research. During the course of my studies I became acquainted with Unix-based operating systems such as Linux and OSX so to get skilled for a future job position in an IT company. I am fluent in object oriented programming especially in Python (with WX and Qt bindings) and Java. I... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 7 - Ground Level

09:00

Supporting the Camera Interface on the C.H.I.P - Maxime Ripard, Free Electrons
Every modern multimedia-oriented ARM SoC usually has some kind of camera interface to be able to capture a video (or photo) stream from an external camera. The framework of choice to support these controllers in Linux is the Video4Linux subsystem, also called v4l2.

This talk will walk through the v4l2 stack, the architecture of a v4l2 driver and the interaction between the SoC driver and its camera's.

The presentation is based on the work we have done to develop such a driver for the Allwinner SoCs, as part of enabling the C.H.I.P platform with the upstream Linux kernel.

Speakers
MR

Maxime Ripard

Embedded Linux Engineer, Free Electrons
Maxime Ripard is an embedded Linux engineer and trainer at Free Electrons since 2011. He is the maintainer of Allwinner ARM SoCs in the Linux kernel. He is also a regular contributor to various Free Software projects related to embedded Linux such as Barebox and Buildroot.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

09:00

Better Alignment of Flash Storage to Mobile System Behavior - Alex Lemberg, SanDisk Company
Smart phones have become the computer that we go to for work and life. As consumers, we demand real time performance and unlimited storage. This has translated into modern Android mobile systems and platforms demanding very strong performance requirements from embedded storage devices. This presentation will cover the characterization of those requirements based on real mobile usage cases and benchmarks analysis, and how the modern embedded flash management solutions are solving it. We will also cover what storage driver developers need to know in order to enable mobile/embedded flash devices to perform faster.

Speakers
avatar for Alex Lemberg

Alex Lemberg

SW Manager, SanDisk Company
Alex Lemberg is a senior SW Manager in SanDisk company, with 14 years of experience in design, debugging, development, analysis and testing of embedded and mobile flash based storage solutions (eMMC/SD, NAND, NOR) and operation systems. | He is focused and passionate about the following areas: | - Design and Development of New and Existing Storage Protocols Features | - Block Device Drivers and IO Stack | - System Storage Performance Analysis... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

09:00

Brillo and Weave Internals - Karim Yaghmour, Opersys inc.
While Android has shipped in more than a billion phones and has made its way into countless hmi systems, its uses have remained user-centric; that, despite some community attempts over the years to show that it can be used in headless systems. Google changed all that by introducing Brillo and Weave. By using an Android-based system to venture head on into the world of IOT, Google has chosen to leverage its success in one ecosystem to help shape a completely different one. But what exactly is Brillo? How close is it related to Android? What's Weave and what does it do? This talk will dive into the internals of Brillo and Weave. We'll look at a Brillo/Weave system in action and explain what makes it work and what it shares with its closely-related, robot cousin. Namely, we'll show how Brillo uses none of Android's Java parts, and how Weave is a set of network services running on Brillo.

Speakers
avatar for Karim Yaghmou

Karim Yaghmou

CEO, Opersys inc.
Karim is part serial entrepreneur, part unrepentant geek. He's most widely know for his O'Reilly books: "Building Embedded Linux Systems" and "Embedded Android". As an active member of the open source community since the mid-90's, he pioneered the world of Linux tracing with the Linux Trace Toolkit and introduced Adeos, one of the first nanokernels/hypervisors for Linux. As part of his work, he's had the privilege of working with teams from a... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

09:00

Securing the Connected Car - Eystein Stenberg, Mender.io
Using recent real-world stories, Eystein Stenberg, Product Manager at Mender.io, will discuss the opportunity of connected cars and walk the audience through the following:

* Opportunities OEMs have for connected vehicles, as demonstrated by Tesla’s ability to provide over-the-air (OTA) software updates that Elon Musk claims has reduced the chances of having an accident by 50%. It also provided Tesla with new revenue streams via the Autopilot's suite of autonomous driving functions.

* The anatomy of the Jeep Cherokee hack: the technical details of how the Jeep Cherokee was hacked and steps you can take to reduce your attack surface. We will detail what Charlie Miller and Chris Valasek revealed and how they gained control of the car remotely, as ewll as provide specific security strategies.

* Best practices on delivering over-the-air software updates with failover management.

Speakers
avatar for Eystein Stenberg

Eystein Stenberg

CTO, Mender.io
Eystein Stenberg has over 7 years of experience in security and systems management as a developer, support engineer, technical account manager, product manager and now as a CTO. He has been in the front line of some of the largest production environments in various roles and has in-depth knowledge of the challenges in systems security in a real-world context. Eystein has spoken at various conferences, including Embedded Linux Conference, Embedded... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

09:00

IoT 101: Getting Connected for Developers (Registration Required)
To register for the IoT 101 Workshop, please add the event to your ELC + Open IoT existing registration

Additional Details

Are you a developer who wants to learn about the Internet of Things (IoT)? Do you want to retrieve data from Internet-connected sensors for applications in home automation, healthcare, automotive, government and more? Do you want to control sensors and devices remotely from cloud, mobile, or desktop applications? In this IoT workshop you will use an IoT prototyping kit (that is yours to keep) to learn how to program a microcontroller (the “Thing” in IoT) that uses a variety of physical sensors such as light and temperature sensors; control switches; servos; and motors.

You will learn how to connect this “Thing” to Microsoft Azure IoT services to both collect data and issue control commands to the devices. Once you master prototyping the hardware and connecting it to the Cloud, you will learn how to leverage Azure IoT services to gain insight into the data coming from your connected Thing, including analytics and machine learning. Following the workshop you may continue your experience with your prototyping kit with additional hands-on labs you can subscribe to online. All you need to bring is your own laptop for this workshop.

 

 


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 17:00
Salon 17 Riga - Level 1

09:00

Tracing Summit (Registration Required)
To register for the Tracing Summit, please add the event to your ELC + Open IoT existing registration

The Tracing Summit will gather people involved in development and end-users of tracing tools as well as trace analysis tools. The main target of this event is to provide room for discussion between people in the various areas that benefit from tracing, namely parallel, distributed and/or real-time systems, as well as kernel development.

Detailed Schedule 

 

 


Wednesday October 12, 2016 09:00 - 17:30
Hall Berlin E - Ground Level

10:00

Coffee Break
Wednesday October 12, 2016 10:00 - 10:45
Gallery, Level 1

10:45

Designing a Distro from Scratch Using OpenEmbedded - Part 2 - Koen Kooi, Linaro
Designing a distro from scratch using OpenEmbedded - Part 2 (Koen Kooi, Linaro) - OpenEmbedded makes building a distro really easy, but there are no examples of how to design and build a general purpose distro from scratch. This presentation is continuation of the one given and ELC 2016 in San Diego. That presentation dealt with getting the metadata into place where this presentation will focus on the actual distribution configuration.

There are a number of obvious knobs a distribution can turn, like selecting the init system, C library and package manager. OE has a lot of not so well known option that a distribution developer can change, like forcing static linking, having no /usr or disallowing GPLv3 software.

During this presentation different OE derived distributions will be compared to see what they view as value added differentation and sane defaults.

Speakers
KK

Koen Kooi

Release Manager, Linaro
Koen is the lead developer of the Angstrom distribution, a core developer of the OpenEmbedded project. He works for Linaro as the release manager as his day job.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 10:45 - 11:35
Salon 7 - Ground Level

10:45

Drones Still Going Open Source - Julien Beraud, Parrot
Parrot Drones are all running Linux with a proprietary firmware but the fact that it is built on top of a Linux kernel and runs entirely on Linux makes it very easy to replace by an open source firmware. After ArduPilot has been ported on the Bebop and then Bebop 2, a key feature was still missing, the ability to capture and stream video. Julien will present the progresses that have been made about how to enable video streaming and recording with a firmware based on ArduPilot as a flight stack and will also talk about the new open source projects around Parrot Drones.

Speakers
avatar for Julien Beraud

Julien Beraud

Software Engineer, Parrot
After developing and maintaining video and graphics device drivers for Parrot on several types of devices ranging from automotive multimedia solutions to consumer electronics drones, Julien has ported ArduPilot on Parrot Bebop and Bebop 2 and is developing video software while still contributing to ArduPilot and the overall open source drone ecosystem. He is convinced that the future of drones is Linux as an embedded platform offering multiple... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 10:45 - 11:35
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

10:45

Leveraging the Open Source Development Model Inside Your Company - Mark Gisi, Wind River Systems
The Open Source Software Movement is responsible for creating some of the most valuable software of the 20th and 21st centuries. It gave us successes such as Linux, GCC, Apache Server, Eclipse, Git, Firefox, MySQL, Drupal, Python, WordPress, Hadoop, and Open Stack, just to name a few. All were developed using a loosely coupled, widely distributed, open development model. While economists and sociologists continue to scratch their heads trying to make sense of it all, one thing no one refutes: the Open Development model has been very successful. The question is: Can companies deploy this approach internally to obtain similar successes? Wind River conducted a pilot project to test the hypothesis that we can. We discuss why the Open Development model works internally, pitfalls to avoid, how it fosters innovation and the benefits it offers to both engineers and the company collectively.

Speakers
avatar for Mark Gisi

Mark Gisi

Senior Intellectual Property Manager, Wind River Systems
Mark Gisi, Directory of Intellectual Property and Open Source at Wind River Systems (an Intel subsidiary), has been responsible for managing Open Source policies, processes and programs for the past 10 years. Mark has extensive experience managing the use of open source software to both maximize ROI and mitigate risk. That includes managing Open source software to go beyond reducing costs such as: accelerating innovation; fostering internal... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 10:45 - 11:35
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

10:45

Linux DRM: New Picture Processing API - Marek Szyprowski, Samsung Electronics Polska Sp. z o.o.
Direct Rendering Manager (DRM) framework with Kernel Mode Setting (KMS) became generic API for the graphics display stack for Linux. Recently introduced extensions like atomic mode setting and universal planes allows to expose most of the features of the graphics display subsystem to generic applications, which don't need to use any hardware specific API. The next common part of graphics hardware (especially in the embedded systems) are various picture processing modules (i.e. copying, colour space conversion, scaling, rotation, etc). Such blocks can be used by vendor specific extensions. However this is not the best approach, especially if one want to design some hardware-independent application. This talk will focus on presenting the new proposal for the extension to the DRM subsystem, which provides access to the picture processing hardware blocks in the unified and generic way.

Speakers
MS

Marek Szyprowski

Samsung Electronics Polska Sp. z o.o.
Marek is a Linux kernel developer at Samsung R&D Institute, Warsaw, Poland. He specializes in embedded systems. His ongoing effort is to provide better support for Samsung SoC in the Linux kernel. This includes core platform support as well as various updates to the device drivers and frameworks developed in cooperation with the community.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 10:45 - 11:35
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

10:45

(In)secure Things - Shane Coughlan, Insignary
Open Source has the potential to deliver faster development cycles and better security than traditional proprietary approaches to software. However, turning the potential of Open Source into reality can be difficult, as highlighted by recent security issues like Heartbleed, Shellshock and the DROWN attack. This talk will explore how we can address Open Source security in practical, effective ways in the context of connected devices. It will focus on the benefits of the Open Source model when applied correctly and offer perspectives on how to avoid pitfalls in production environments.

Speakers
avatar for Shane Coughlan

Shane Coughlan

VP, Global Business Development, Insignary
Shane Coughlan is an expert in communication, security and business development. He is well known for building bridges between commercial and non-commercial stakeholders in the technology sector. His professional accomplishments include establishing a legal department for the primary NGO promoting Free Software in Europe, building a professional network of over 270 legal counsel and technical experts across 4 continents, and launching the first... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 10:45 - 11:35
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

10:45

Creating Continuous Delivery for Yocto Based IoT Distribution - Alexander Kanevskiy, Intel
Presentation shares experience of creating collaborative infrastructure for Ostro Project IoT focused Linux distribution using Yocto tools, GitHub, Jenkins and several other tools to establish Continuous Delivery pipeline for the project. It focuses on establishing efficient processes for code review, automatic testing and cooperation with upstreams. It describes how efficiently organize your layers and distro configuration files, get to know power of combo-layer tool that is used to create Yocto's Poky reference distribution and submodules approach. Presentation would explain wide scope of aspects, like basic principles of Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery for complex projects such as Linux distributions, as well as some underwater stones of scaling Yocto tools, managing complex source code and different approaches for derivative product specific distributions.

Speakers
avatar for Alexander Kanevskiy

Alexander Kanevskiy

Architect, Intel
Alexander has almost 20 years of experience in area of creating Linux distributions for different market segments, SCM, Infrastructure, Release Engineering, Continuous Integration & Delivery and various build systems. Previous projects: BlackCat Linux, ASPLinux, OpenWall, Maemo, MeeGo, Tizen Currently employed by Intel, Open Source Technology Center in Embedded Systems group as Architect.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 10:45 - 11:35
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

10:45

Devicetree Hardware Autoconfiguration - Hans de Goede, Red Hat
One can buy 7" android tablets for aprox 35 usd now, assuming one gets the standard q8 Allwinner based model these are actually supported by the mainline linux kernel now.

These tablets use a standard case + SoC + display, which get paired with a different touchscreen-controller, accelerometer and wifi chip for every other batch.

This talk will outline my experience in making a single devicetree file covering all variants using an in kernel hardware autodetection module which creates and applies devicetree changesets depending on the detected hardware.

This talk will give the audience an idea what is and is not possible wrt dynamic devicetree usage as well as give does and don'ts for people who want to use dynamic devicetree themselves.

Speakers
avatar for Hans de Goede

Hans de Goede

Senior Software Engineer, Red Hat
Hans has been a Linux developer since 1996, working for Red Hat since 2008. He primarily works on Linux webcam support, USB redirection for virtual machines and has recently joined Red Hat's Graphics team. In his spare time Hans works on Linux support for Allwinner ARM SoCs. Hans has given talks on a variety of topics at Fosdem, Plumbers and KVM forum.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 10:45 - 11:35
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

11:45

Audio on Linux: The End of a Golden Age? - Lars-Peter Clausen, Analog Devices
For the last 5-6 years consumer audio on Linux has a enjoyed a golden age. For new hardware chances were good that audio was working out of the box. This was the result of a combination of mostly standardized hardware and a mature software system. But due to changes in technology and market demand the hardware architecture has been rapidly changing recently.

This talk will start by looking at the history of the consumer audio support on Linux with a particular focus on the ALSA framework and related infrastructure. It will look at the major steps in the evolution of the hardware architectures, what triggered them and how they were accommodated on the software side. It will analyse why things worked so well in the recent past and then present an outlook into the future and the upcoming challenges that need to be addressed and present some potential solutions.

Speakers
LC

Lars-Peter Clausen

Software Developer, Analog Devices
Lars is a software developer working at Analog Devices. Among other things he works on Linux kernel audio device drivers and has been a contributor to the ALSA an ASoC framework. He has spoken in the past at conferences like FOSDEM or ELCE mostly about Linux kernel related subjects.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 11:45 - 12:35
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

11:45

Efficient Visual Avoidance and Control for UAVs with Embedded GPUs - Kabir Mohammed, UASys
Indoor and outdoor navigation for small UAVs like quadrotors is still far from being a solved problem and most research and demonstration of visual navigation solutions have been conducted on traditional CPU architectures. Due to high computation demands of a full vision-based navigation stack (depth extraction, odometry, mapping, planning and control) a heavy and often power-hungry onboard computer is needed to simultaneously run all the tasks onboard.

For this presentation, we demonstrate a quadrotor UAV equipped with Nvidia's Jetson TX1 embedded GPU compute module and high-speed vision system, running our complete navigation stack onboard, at a tenth of the weight and power consumption. Our compact quadrotor is capable of tight, fast maneuvers and safe GPS-denied indoor hover, with onboard mapping, sense-and-avoid, precision landing and HD streaming.

Speakers
avatar for Kabir Mohammed

Kabir Mohammed

Co-founder and Technical Lead, UASys
I'm Kabir, a 18 year old student from India. I've worked with various open-source flight-control projects since 2007. I'm currently an active developer for PX4 Pro Autopilot project. I'm currently working on Artemis, my micro-aerial-vehicle research project on making autonomous obstacle avoidance and GPS-denied navigation possible for small multi-rotor craft. Our software stack is freely available on GitHub for anyone to replicate a similar... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 11:45 - 12:35
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2
  • Experience Level Any

11:45

The Path of the Private FUTEX - Sebastian Siewior, Linutronix GmbH
We had a few changes in -RT to improve its performance. One example is the introduction of ,,lazy preempt'' which aims at avoiding ,,bad'' preemption spots which would lead to lock contention followed by another scheduling event. Lazy preempt is also an attempt to stay close to what mainline does in similar situations and the result is an improvement in performance especially in disk throughput. This talk is about the proposed changes in kernel's futex implementation which may reduce the latency in certain contended locking and unlocking path and benefits to mainline as well especially on big NUMA machines. It also covers some of the unexpected review comments on the mailinglist which led to changes in the design of addressing the problem.

Speakers
SS

Sebastian Siewior

Linutronix GmbH
I maintain the Preempt-RT patchset for several years as part of my work for Linutronix, and once even I even ported -RT to m68knommu. Two years ago I presented what it means to play catch up with mainline with the -RT patchset at Linux Plumbers.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 11:45 - 12:35
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

11:45

Using ELBE to Build Debian Based Embedded Systems - Manuel Traut, Linutronix GmbH
Debian is a Linux distribution that is available for different CPU architectures, it is stable and secure. Best preconditions to be used in an embedded system! ELBE is an open-source Debian based embedded

Linux build environment (http://elbe-rfs.org). ELBE can be used to generate reproducable Debian based firmware images. In this talk Manuel shows howto create a Debian based firmware image for an embedded ARM platform. The build result, including a flashable image, licence informations and source codes of the open-source components will be discussed. He also shows how to integrate own software or do other customizations

like adding users or modifying config files in a reproducable way.

Speakers
avatar for Manuel Traut

Manuel Traut

Software Specialist, Linutronix GmbH
Manuel works as Software Specialist at Linutronix GmbH since 2007. In this time he had the chance to build various Linux based BSPs with different methods and toolkits. With this knowledge in mind he currently maintains the embedded linux build environment (ELBE http://elbe-rfs.org). ELBE reuses as much as possible from the Debian project. He regularly acts as Trainer for various embedded Linux topics and has given Linux related talks at... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 11:45 - 12:35
Salon 7 - Ground Level

11:45

A More Open Trust Protocol - Christian Brindley, Symantec
After a quick review of recent IOT security debacles of past years, and more recent progress toward IoT Security by organizations such as the AllSeen Alliance, Open Connectivity Foundation, and the Industrial Internet Consortia, this talk will provide a developer-oriented deep dive on a new protocol developed in collaboration between ARM and two Global 2,000 companies along with other stakeholders. This new protocol aims to make it easier for developers to leverage hardware-backed security. Hardware-backed security comes in many forms, TPM, TEE, HSM SOC, ASIC and more. The protocol is first demonstrated in a TEE context, but could relatively easily be applied to other hardware-backed security architectures. 

Speakers
avatar for Christian Brindley

Christian Brindley

IoT Technical Specialist, EMEA, Symantec



Wednesday October 12, 2016 11:45 - 12:35
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

11:45

Open Source Bluetooth Device Firmware for IoT and Makers - Marcel Holtmann, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
This presentation shows the possibilities on how to build an open source Bluetooth device firmware to enable various new IoT and Maker community use cases. It provides an extensive overview on how to use the Mynewt project to build an open source Bluetooth device firmware for Nordic nRF51 and nRF52 class of radio chips and then interact with them using Linux or Zephyr operating systems. For example utilizing Linux on Minnowboard or Zephyr on Arduino 101 systems. With full control over the Bluetooth device firmware, the possibility for new and interesting applications are endless.

Speakers
MH

Marcel Hotmann

Help Desk, Intel
Marcel Holtmann is working at Intel's Open Source Technology Center. He is the maintainer of the BlueZ open source Bluetooth stack and has been working on Bluetooth technology since 2001.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 11:45 - 12:35
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

11:45

Wyliodrin STUDIO: An Open Source Tool for IoT Development - Serban Razvan, Wyliodrin
Have you been using your development board (like the Raspberry pi for example) as a glorified computer? Are you tired of needing to hookup your boards to a display and keyboard any time you want to program them?
Wyliodrin STUDIO is a software development tool especially created for the design of IoT projects. It comes as an open source Chrome extension so that programmers can use it independently of their specific OS platform and with little setup overhead.
Wyliodrin STUDIO abstract away many of the issues regarding setting up your development boards and allows programmers to directly focus on their projects. It offers a friendly programming environment with many of the features of advanced IDEs, like Eclipse.
For beginners, Wyliodrin STUDIO offers a large range of tutorials to help people take their first steps in IoT development.
MagPi gave Wylidorin STUDIO a 5/5 rating.

Speakers
avatar for Razvan Serban

Razvan Serban

Developer, Wyliodrin


Wednesday October 12, 2016 11:45 - 12:35
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

12:35

14:00

ASoC: Supporting Audio on an Embedded Board - Alexandre Belloni, Free Electrons
ASoC, which stands for ALSA System on Chip, is a Linux kernel subsystem created to provide better ALSA support for system-on-chip and portable audio codecs. It allows to reuse codec drivers across multiple architectures and provides an API to integrate them with the SoC audio interface.

This talk will present the typical hardware architecture of audio devices on embedded platforms, present the ASoC API and how to use it for machine drivers, which are used to glue audio codecs with the processor audio interface. Examples, common issues and debugging tipswill also be discussed.

Speakers
avatar for Alexandre Belloni

Alexandre Belloni

Embedded Linux, Kernel and Android engineer, Free Electrons
Alexandre joined Free Electrons in 2013, a company offering development, consulting and training services to embedded Linux system developers worldwide. He has been working on embedded systems since 2005, mostly Linux on ARM but also MIPS and x86 and so contributes to the usual projects part of the embedded Linux ecosystem: Barebox, u-boot, Buildroot, Yocto Project and the kernel. Alexandre is now the co-maintainer of the Atmel ARM SoCs support... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

14:00

Choosing Linux for New Use Cases - Tsugikazu Shibata, NEC
Using Linux is the primary choice for almost all the new projects in the new industry sectors such as Cloud Computing, IoT, Drone, Robotics and so on.

Each deferent sectors have different requirements. For example, requirements of software lifetime is 3-5 years to 10-20 years; but also, each sector's people are looking at the value of Open Source, to be able to modify/update source code, share the knowledge, upstream relationship and neutral development scheme. LTSI was started as a community to maintain the Linux kernel for long term to meet industry requirements since 2011.

This presentation shows you various choices of Linux for new projects with analysis of each choices including LTSI. Also, attendees will learm about how LTSI can help industry developers with latest development status and its plan.

Speakers
avatar for Tsugikazu Shibata

Tsugikazu Shibata

Chief Advavnced Technologist, Open Source Promotion Center, NEC
Tsugikazu Shibata is LTSI Project lead. Tsugikazu Shibata is Chief advanced Technologies of NEC and he has been working on coordinating the relationship between industry and community since the early days of Japanese Linux community. He have spoken at number of Open Source conferences such as LinuxCon, Embedded Linux Conference and OpenStack summit. He is also a board member of the Linux Foundation.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

14:00

Exploring Linux Kernel Source Code with Eclipse and QTCreator - Marcin Bis
Getting through millions lines of Linux kernel source code is tough task. Especially for a person not used to editors like Vim or Emacs, which both are powerful tools, yet hard to configure and sometimes considered misleading.

The talk will cover usage of two open-source IDEs: Eclipse (mostly) and QTCreator to develop device drivers and explore kernel source code using various cross toolchains (including SDK generated by Yocto Project tools, with, and without dedicated plugins). IDE configuration, good practices, side-to-side examples of good and bad IDE configuration and its influence on development process. The talk will include presentation and short tutorial - practical demonstration of Eclipse configuration, writing and debugging kernel driver on remote ARM platform, Material is based on author's personal experience of working on various projects.

Speakers
avatar for Marcin Bis

Marcin Bis

Embedded Linux Engineer, BIS-LINUX.COM
I have been dealing with Linux in embedded systems since 2007. I run a consulting company bis-linux.com. I help my customers to create business value on every step of product life-cycle by mentoring engineers and working as Embedded Linux Engineer or Technical Leader. I provide Embedded Linux, Drivers Development and Yocto trainings (both: open and on-site). I wrote books covering Embedded Linux topics (in Polish 2007, 2005). I have experience in... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2
  • Experience Level Any

14:00

Verified Boot: From ROM to Userspace - Marc Kleine-Budde, Pengutronix e.K.
On current ARM processors like Freescale's i.MX6 all requirements to cryptographically prevent undetected tampering of the system exist (and are openly documented). All the necessary building blocks are available right now as FOSS: Starting with the bootloader, through the Kernel and finally every byte on the root file system can be signed by our own cryptographic keys. When such a system booted successfully, the system's owner can be sure that no unwanted changes to the software have been made. In this talk, the involved software components are presented and the possibilities and limitations of this approach are discussed. Furthermore, some lessons learned during a large project are shared, especially to avoid some of the obstacles during development.

Speakers
avatar for Marc Kleine-Budde

Marc Kleine-Budde

Developer, Pengutronix e.K.
Marc Kleine-Budde started using Linux in 1995, he works for Pengutronix e.K. in Hildesheim after he got his diploma in Electrical Engineering specialized in Computer Engineering in 2005 at Leibniz University Hannover. At Pengutronix he is working on the Linux Kernel and low level userspace. Since 2012 he is maintainer of the CAN drivers in the Linux kernel.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Salon 7 - Ground Level

14:00

Demystifying Systemd for Embedded Systems - Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri, ProFUSION Embedded Systems
Embedded systems often have great goals such as fast boot and reliable execution, management and isolation of services. However due lack of understanding, some myths and great deal of FUD they go with custom hackish implementations based on shell scripts and sysvinit-like replacements like busybox.

This presentation will cover experiences to slim down systemd footprint by disabling its components in order to compare apples-to-apples, then show how systemd scales up in a nice linear way, while alternatives start to barf when many components must be put together to cover networking, timed tasks, logging, dynamic device behavior and services babysitting and isolation.

The presentation concludes why Ostro Project decided to mandate systemd in this distribution targeted at Internet of Things.

Speakers
avatar for Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri

Gustavo Sverzut Barbieri

Owner, ProFUSION Embedded Systems
Software developer since 1991, Gustavo joined the open source community around 1998 and started to contribute actively to many projects in many areas and programming languages. He is passionate about interactive software, which led him to work at INdT with EFL (Enlightenment Foundation Libraries). Around 2008 he founded ProFUSION embedded systems to offer software services. In 2013 his company was acquired by Intel, being the base of OTC... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

14:00

Software Update for IoT: The Current State of Play - Chris Simmonds, 2net
Many embedded Linux projects have a requirement to update the software on devices in the field. Recent security flaws in basic components such as OpenSSL and bash, combined with the interconnectedness of all things, have highlighted the problem and made it an absolute necessity. No doubt as a consequence of this, there is a lot of activity in this area.

In this presentation, I begin by looking at the basic requirements of an update mechanism: that it must be be atomic, robust and secure. Then I will look at specific solutions, including package feeds, and image-based updaters, such as swupdate, swupd and rauc. Finally, I will look at the idea of including the updater in an end-to-end software deployment system, as is provided by Mender, Resin.io and Brillo.

Speakers
avatar for Chris Simmonds

Chris Simmonds

Consultant, 2net
Chris Simmonds is a freelance consultant and trainer who has been using Linux in embedded systems for over 15 years. He is the author of the book “Mastering Embedded Linux Programming”, and is a frequent presenter at open source and embedded conferences, including the Embedded Linux Conference and Embedded World. He has been running training courses in embedded Linux since 2002 and has delivered hundreds of sessions to many well-known... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 14:00 - 14:50
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

14:00

Tutorial: Building an IoT Empire - Michael Schloh von Bennewitz, Computer Scientist
Objective

In this half day course, we learn theory and practice of IoT use cases by implementing them hands on. A number of IoT hardware devices are observed, handled, and put in service. We develop firmware for embedded devices and even construct our own Bluetooth beacons.

Checklist

- How Bluetooth and Bluetooth Smart devices participate in the Internet of Things
- How a beacon and physical web works, and how to apply proximity technology
- To develop applications for embedded devices and firmware deployment workflow
- To extend IoT systems with MQTT and/or AMQP based sensor and actuator embedded devices

We learn the ropes of the Internet of Things by implementing IoT systems using real hardware meant for deployment in the real world. Each participant receives a set of embedded development kits and beacons to conduct guided experiments for the duration of the workshop.

Speakers
avatar for Michael Schloh von Bennewitz

Michael Schloh von Bennewitz

Computer Scientist, Europalab Networks
Michael Schloh von Bennewitz is a computer scientist specializing in network software, mobile computing, and client server design. Responsible for research, development, and maintenance of packages in several community software repositories, Michael actively contributes to the Opensource development community. Fluent in four languages, he has presented for groups including Cable & Wireless, Nokia, Ubuntu, Mobile World Congress, and FOSDEM... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 14:00 - 15:50
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

15:00

Automotive Collaboration: What's Really Going On? Has Something Improved During the Last Year? - Paul Sherwood, Codethink Ltd
Over the last few years there's been a growing realisation that developing and maintaining automotive software over the long term is a truly hard problem. Dramatic increases in the amount of in-vehicle code complexity, along with integration of more and more functionality - these factors are driving the industry to collaborate, open up proprietary ip for re-use and build on established FOSS solutions.

Following last year's panel at ELCE, this edition aims to look at what has changed/improved 'on the ground' in this new collaborative environment during the last year. Again, the aim will be to involve actual engineers in the discussion, so participants can get an understanding of how well the various initiatives are playing out for community members in OEMs, Tier1s, Software Vendors and System Integrators.

Speakers
avatar for Paul Sherwood

Paul Sherwood

CEO, Codethink
Paul Sherwood is Chairman of Codethink, which provides advanced software engineering primarily for FOSS, embedded systems, automotive systems and cloud infrastructure. Paul has an MA in Engineering from Oxford University. He developed his first commercial software in 1981, founded Teleca in 1992, wrote the Software Commandments in 1996, and has consulted at telcos, OEMs and service providers. He is currently leading GENIVI's Tools Team, and has... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

15:00

Cameras in Embedded Systems: Device Tree and ACPI View - Sakari Ailus, Intel
Cameras in embedded systems are often collections of different components rather than monolithic devices such as USB webcams. They consist of sensors, lenses, LED or xenon flashes and ISPs, each of which are individual devices with their specific drivers.

Once the prevalent solution for supporting hardware variation between different ARM based systems was platform data. Since around 2011 new platform data files have had hard time getting to mainline, the preferred solution being the Device tree. However, Device tree support in the V4L2 framework was not around until over a years after that, additionally help from the V4L2 async framework is also required in order to achieve the same functionality as with platform data.

Show how the frameworks are used in drivers and Device tree source. Review the status of ACPI and discuss potential future developments.

Speakers
SA

Sakari Ailus

Intel
Sakari Ailus first became familiar with Linux in 1994 and has been doing Linux kernel programming since around 2001. Sakari has contributed to the Linux kernel including but not limited to V4L2 and Media controller subsystems. Sakari is especially interested in cameras in embedded systems.Sakari works for Intel in Finland.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

15:00

Isar: Build Debian-Based Products with BitBake - Baurzhan Ismagulov, ilbers GmbH
There is a number of embedded Linux distributions, and most of them are source-based. This has its reasons, advantages and disadvantages. Studies show that companies today are exposed to a much higher time-to-market pressure than some 20 years ago. With multiple products, huge source code bases, several software suppliers: When it has to be efficient, using pre-built binary packages for development and production is a must.

Isar is an integration system for complete image generation using binary Debian packages. It provides the structure, tools and workflows for starting a project to build multiple products, managing common subsystems and product variances, continuously developing the components by different vendors.

In this talk, Baurzhan will describe the context and motivation for Isar, its current state, advantages and challenges to overcome.

Speakers
BI

Baurzhan Ismagulov

General Manager, ilbers GmbH
Baurzhan Ismagulov is a software engineer and leads a software development team at ilbers GmbH. He develops solutions, provides consultancy and trainings in the embedded area. He is a passionate Linux user and developer since kernel 1.2.13. He has held talks at conferences like embedded world, Real-Time Linux Workshop, FOSDEM.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Salon 7 - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

15:00

Running UBI/UBIFS on MLC NAND - Richard Weinberger, sigma star gmbh & Boris Brezillon, Free Electrons
UBIFS was designed with SLC NAND in mind. These days, almost a decade later, MLC NAND is widely available and used. Embedded Linux offers currently no filesystem which can be used on MLC NAND.

In the last few months Boris Brezillon (free electrons) and Richard Weinberger (sigma star gmbh) have been

heavily working on MLC support for UBIFS.

In this presentation Boris and Richard will talk about the challenges they have faced and how UBIFS finally gained MLC (and basic TLC) NAND support.

Beside of implementation details, Boris and Richard will also explain how to use UBIFS on MLC and what developers need to consider.

Speakers
avatar for Richard Weinberger

Richard Weinberger

co-founder, sigma star gmbh
Richard Weinberger is co-founder of sigma star gmbh and offers Linux kernel consulting services. He's been working with Linux for 10 years and works on the Linux kernel for more than five years. Besides of the kernel he has a strong focus on various low level components of Linux including virtualization techniques. Upstream he currently maintains UBI/UBIFS and UserModeLinux (UML).


Wednesday October 12, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

15:00

IPv6 for Embedded Developers used to IPv4 - Thiago Macieira, Intel
IPv6 is the evolution of the Internet Protocol and was created in the late 1990s when it was clear that the then-current version (IPv4) would run out of available addresses soon. Soon after, software was converted to handle IPv6 and the all service providers began offering IPv6 connectivity. Right? Not really. It's been a chicken-and-the-egg problem: no apps supports it, so ISPs don't support it, so no apps supports it. This session will go over the basics of IPv6, how it differs from IPv4 and what application developers should be aware of. It will go over the basic socket API and provide instruction for developers on how to write software capable of both IPv4 and v6, seamlessly. It will then discuss how application protocols can benefit of the expanded address space, multicasting abilities, header compression in mesh networks and other technology not available in IPv4.

Speakers
avatar for Thiago Macieira

Thiago Macieira

Intel
Thiago Macieira holds a double degree in Engineering and an MBA. He has been involved in several Open Source projects for over 15 years and is an experienced C++ developer, having spent the better part of the last 10 years developing Qt and Qt-based software. In the last two years, he's also been working closely with C++ committee members in discussing and improving the suggestions for upcoming language features. He has been involved with many... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

15:00

Software Updates for Connected Devices: Key Considerations - Eystein Stenberg, Mender.io
A key requirement for connected devices/IoT is the ability to deploy software updates. Data breaches are occurring on a regular basis and extending devices outside the firewall perimeter increases the attack surface. There are on average 1-25 bugs/defects per 1,000 lines of code.

The good news is that security breaches are largely preventable. The Center of Internet Security estimates that 80-90% can be prevented through swift software updates and patching, which are necessary in order to:

Deploy bug fixes
Patch security vulnerabilities
Deliver new features

In this presentation, we will cover all the nuances and security considerations one must be mindful of when deploying software updates to connected devices to ensure the security and integrity of devices deployed in the wild.

Speakers
avatar for Eystein Stenberg

Eystein Stenberg

CTO, Mender.io
Eystein Stenberg has over 7 years of experience in security and systems management as a developer, support engineer, technical account manager, product manager and now as a CTO. He has been in the front line of some of the largest production environments in various roles and has in-depth knowledge of the challenges in systems security in a real-world context. Eystein has spoken at various conferences, including Embedded Linux Conference, Embedded... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 15:00 - 15:50
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

15:50

Coffee Break
Wednesday October 12, 2016 15:50 - 16:30
Gallery, Level 1

16:30

Building and Testing an Automotive Platform - How Automotive Grade Linux is Built and Tested - Jan-Simon Moeller, The Linux Foundation
Ever since Linux started running on embedded devices, having a swap for such had been considered a misconfiguration rather than a method for overcoming RAM shortage or performance booster. This attitude started to change with the spread of Android devices which usually don’t have a problem utilizing virtually any amount of memory. An with the introduction of ZRAM the usage of a compressed swap in RAM became more useful and more popular. This talk will give a comprehensive description of ZRAM and its counterpart, zswap, a summary of pro’s and con’s of both. This talk will also cover a brand new z3fold compressed memory allocator which can be used for both zswap and ZRAM, of course presenting measurement results for these, obtained on various devices, ranging from set top boxes to laptops, not to forget Android phones.

Speakers
avatar for Jan-Simon Moeller

Jan-Simon Moeller

Linux Foundation Trainer, The Linux Foundation
Jan-Simon Möller is the AGL Release Manager and also a trainer for the Linux Foundations Training Program. He holds a Dipl.-Ing. degree in electrical engineering with strong background in Embedded Linux ranging from realtime to SELinux.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 16:30 - 17:20
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

16:30

Deby - Reproducible and Maintainable Embedded Linux Environment with Poky - Kazuhiro Hayashi, Toshiba Corporation
For civil infrastructure system related products, kernel and open source software included in the system requires not only industrial grade but also super long term support. We have developed a meta layer for Poky build system which can uses the Debian’s source codes to share long term maintenance effort. However, there is an issue on source code management for product development which relates on reproducibility and maintainability. We have some experiences in product maintenance phase, for example, a bug occurred more than three years later after the product was released. In such kind of case, if we can reproduce the Linux environment for any older version, it is useful to find the source of issue.

In this talk, we will explain how to manage source codes and how to generate an embedded Linux environment with Poky and Deby for long term maintenance.

Speakers
KH

Kazuhiro Hayashi

Toshiba Corporation
Kazuhiro Hayashi has been working at TOSHIBA Corporation as a Software Engineer since 2010. He works on developing Linux for embedded system for various products especially for civil infrastructure related systems.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 16:30 - 17:20
Salon 7 - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

16:30

Open Source for Automotive Developed in the Open becomes Real: GENIVI Development Platform - Agustin Benito Bethencourt, Codethink Ltd
GDP is the GENIVI Alliance Open Source Development Platform for automotive. It is an open project. After releasing GDP-ivi9 in Apr'16, the project is focused on the next version integrating new specific components for automotive use cases. as well as improving processes and tooling.

Agustin will focus the presentation on technical aspects, describing the components developed by GENIVI, specially those new ones available in the next version, how to download, run and build GDP as well as how to contribute to GDP 10. The last few minutes of the talk Agustin will pay attention to the technical challenges being faced during this new release cycle.

Further information about GDP:

* Landing page: http://projects.genivi.org/gdp

* Source code: https://github.com/GENIVI/genivi-dev-platform

* Download page: http://projects.genivi.org/gdp/download

Speakers
avatar for Agustin Benito Bethencourt

Agustin Benito Bethencourt

Principal Consultant - FOSS, Codethink Ltd
Bachelor degree in Applied Physics and Master in Training. Agustin Benito Bethencourt has experience as entrepreneur, executive, IT director, product owner and consultant in the FLOSS space. Currently he is Principal Consultant at Codethink Ltd and GENIVI Development Platform Lead. Agustin has extensive experience working in the open in Open Source communities (KDE e.V. member), companies, consortium and trade associations. Full background... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 16:30 - 17:20
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

16:30

Reconfigurable Computing Architecture for the Linux Kernel - Vince Bridgers & Yves Vandervennet, Intel
Reconfigurable Computing promises to provide a rich set of applications by supporting the dynamic management of user defined devices for I/O and compute acceleration. The application space for these types of solutions range from embedded systems up to industry standard servers, and all types of systems in between. Significant progress has been made in areas such as offload frameworks and automatic synthesis of Hardware Descriptor Languages, but attention now needs to be given to how these new and exciting technologies would be integrated into the standard Linux kernel.

This presentation describes a Scalable Reconfigurable Computing Architecture developed from a simple model that comprehends the most common use cases, including I/O and Compute offload, from embedded systems up to data center applications. Use cases such as OpenCL frameworks are described, as well as custom soft devices for I/O acceleration and computation offload. Logic synthesis flows and how they fit into this architecture is described, with specific use cases ranging from embedded system to data center applications.

Speakers
VB

Vince Bridgers

Software Architect, Altera
Vince Bridgers is a Systems Architect and Software Developer with over 20 years’ experience in systems, device driver, and kernel software development. Vince’s experience spans new system development, graphics, networking, and systems performance optimizations. Vince was an invited speaker at HP Discover in 2010 on the topic of high performance network optimizations, and at the ELC 2015 in San Jose, CA. Vince’s current projects include LLVM... Read More →
YV

Yves Vandervennet

Yves Vandervennet is a software engineer with 15+ years of experience in open source embedded software development and engineering management. Yves' current interests are runtime FPGA management, device tree overlays, all in open source.


Wednesday October 12, 2016 16:30 - 17:20
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

16:30

Avoid the Silos and Help Build the True Internet of Things - Aaron Vernon, Two Bulls
The Internet of Things is growing at an extraordinary rate and has massive potential but the current landscape is absolute chaos. Protocols, standards, transports, alliances, ecosystems, platforms - it all gets a little overwhelming and difficult to navigate. In this session Aaron will help you find your way by giving an overview of the current IoT space including notable technical and architectural differences between approaches. He will then follow this up with recommendations on how we should put aside technical differences, unique approaches and individual business concerns and focus on what this is all about: improving our user's lives through compelling and tangible experiences. Only by working together can we create the true Internet of Things rather than just more 'connected' devices that exist in their own silos.

Speakers
avatar for Aaron Vernon

Aaron Vernon

CTO, Higgns
Aaron has over 9 years experience working as a software engineer at early stage startups. He was the original CTO of Two Bulls and during that time was tech lead of both Breadcrumb and Blokify which exited to Groupon and 3D Systems respectively. Recently he has been at the forefront of the IoT space as VP Software Engineering at LIFX before he was lured back to work with a familiar team on Higgns - an embedded and cloud platform that allows you... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 16:30 - 17:20
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

16:30

Building an IoT-class Device - Igor Stoppa, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
With the constant increase in computational power and capabilities that embedded processors are enjoying, it becomes more and more tempting to create own IoT devices, be it for fun or for profit, or, why not, both.

The process, though, can be daunting.

This tutorial aims at giving both a working methodology, for designing and planning own work, and a set of practical steps, toward the creation of a basic - working - device.

Such device can be seen as foundation for further customization and development.

The example will cover the high level architecture, with a progressive dive into practical aspects, like choosing HW/SW component, dealing with secure design and its implication for sensitive data.

Speakers
IS

Igor Stoppa

SW Engineer, OpenSource Technology Center - Intel
Igor is a SW engineer with Intel. In this role, Igor has worked in various fields: test automation, release management, system SW for IoT devices. Before joining Intel, Igor cut his teeth on uC for TLC and Automotive industry, then moved to write kernel power management SW for Nokia Linux phones/Tablets and had an eyes-opening stint as SW release manager. | | In his free time, he likes to travel with his family and to hack on... Read More →


Wednesday October 12, 2016 16:30 - 17:20
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

16:30

Gateways - The Center of Complexity for Update - Ned Smith, Intel
Gateways - The Center of Complexity for Update (Ned Smith, Intel) - The gateway is thought to be essential for interoperability of IoT networks. Bridging between legacy protocols, exposing IoT to the cloud and translating between multiple standard frameworks are anticipated gateway functions that make it the center of complexity in the network. Software update of IoT devices is complicated within gateways due to the need to inform the gateway regarding device functionality impacted by device updates. A strategy for building secure and scalable software update is needed that considers gateway complexity and the need to free users from customizing the gateway in order to restore interoperability - and do so securely. This talk considers options for secure update of IoT devices that scales with gateway complexity.

Speakers
NS

Ned Smith

Principal Security Architect, Intel
Ned Smith is an active contributor to the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) and chairs the Security, Privacy and Identity working group in the IPSO Alliance. He has several publications on topics that include trusted computing, full disk encryption, virtualization of trusted computing modules, manageability, identity management, enhanced privacy identifiers, IoT using blockchain. He chaired the Infrastructure working group (IWG) and Trusted... Read More →



Wednesday October 12, 2016 16:30 - 17:20
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

17:20

 
Thursday, October 13
 

08:00

Breakfast
Thursday October 13, 2016 08:00 - 09:00
Gallery, Level 1

08:00

Registration Open
Thursday October 13, 2016 08:00 - 16:10
Hall Berlin Foyer - Ground Level

08:15

OpenWrt Summit (Registration Required)
To register for the OpenWrt Summit, please add the event to your ELC + Open IoT existing registration

To help encourage the growth and strength of OpenWrt, LEDE and the broader ecosystem, the OpenWrt Summit Committee is organizing the second OpenWrt Summit.

The OpenWrt Summit will benefit anyone who wants to learn more about OpenWrt software and is a great opportunity for the core community to get together face to face. In particular OpenWrt will be perfect for:

  • OpenWrt/LEDE hackers (core team and contributors)
  • Software developers who maintain OpenWrt/LEDE packages or who want to create packages
  • Home users of OpenWrt/LEDE
  • Hardware and software engineers working with OpenWrt/LEDE, whether at work or for fun
  • Anyone interested in OpenWrt, LEDE, free and open source wireless networking, or embedded Linux

 

 

 


Thursday October 13, 2016 08:15 - 18:00
Hall Berlin D - Ground Level

09:00

BYOD (Build Your Own Device) - Angelo Dureghello, Sysam, Nomovok
There are hundreds of Linux development boards available, but somehow, everyone of them is missing some nifty feature that would make your life oh-so-easier.

During this short talk you'll see how easier is to make your own Linux board, tailored to your wishes while keeping the cost low. While you're building it you'll also learn about some of the low-level (electronics) aspects of what needs to be done in order to boot Linux.

Speakers
AD

Angelo Dureghello

Embedded Software Engineer, Sysam, Nomovok
Born in Venice, 18/12/70, with high interest for electronic, repair and computer programming from child age. Graduate in Telecommunication, 30 years experience in low level programming, C, C++ assembly for several different architectures, skilled also for electronic design and repair. Contributing to u-boot as custodian for m68k architecture.


Thursday October 13, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

09:00

EFL - A UI Toolkit Designed for the Embedded World - Tom Hacohen, Samsung
The EFL is a set of libraries that provide stable API/ABI, high efficiency, low memory usage, and works seamlessly with and without hardware (GPU) acceleration. These reasons and more are why the EFL are being used, on refrigerators, home automation systems, mobile devices, and the Tizen mobile platform among others. In this presentation, Tom will present an overview of the EFL and demonstrate interesting features and concepts of the recently unveiled new EFL API based on the Eo object system.

Speakers
avatar for Tom Hacohen

Tom Hacohen

Senior Software Engineer, Samsung Open Source Group
Tom has been using Linux since 2003. Previously a core developer and part of the leading team at SHR (Openmoko), he is currently a core developer for the EFL (www.enlightenment.org). He has also contributed to many other Open Source projects over the years. In 2010 he started working at Samsung's open source group on the Tizen Linux platform. Tom has presented at FOSDEM, LinuxCon EU, ELCE, SOSCON, and other smaller conferences.


Thursday October 13, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Hall Berlin E - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

09:00

Time is Ready for the Civil Infrastructure Platform - Yoshitake Kobayashi, Toshiba & Urs Gleim, Siemens AG
The Civil Infrastructure Platform (CIP) - launched in April - CIP defined and started to realize a super long-term supported open source "base layer" for industrial grade software. This base layer aims to be used for current and future industrial systems which supports machine-to-machine connectivity for digital future. This kind of systems, being the field for decades, should have long-term support for security and robustness reasons. In this talk, we will show the first steps on CIP development. This includes initial set of components for the base layer and its maintainers. Are you ready? It’s time to start your development with and for the CIP.

Speakers
avatar for Urs Gleim

Urs Gleim

Head of Smart Embedded Systems, Siemens AG, Corporate Technology
Urs Gleim is leading the embedded systems group at Siemens Corporate Technology which hosts the Corporate Competence Center Embedded Linux. This team centrally provides Linux and related technologies for various Siemens products.
avatar for Yoshitake Kobayashi

Yoshitake Kobayashi

TOSHIBA
Yoshitake Kobayashi joined Corporate Software Engineering Center, Toshiba Corporation in 2008. Before that he received his Ph.D. degree in computer science at University of Electro-Communications in 2002 and worked as an assistant professor. His research interests include operating systems, distributed systems and dynamically reconfigurable systems.


Thursday October 13, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 7 - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

09:00

Using SCHED_DEADLINE - Steven Rostedt, Red Hat
Starting in Linux version 3.14, a new scheduling class was introduced. This class is called SCHED_DEADLINE. It implements Earliest Deadline First (EDF) along with a Constant Bandwidth Scheduler (CBS) that is used to give applications a guaranteed amount of CPU for a periodic period. This type of scheduling is advantageous for robotics, media players and recorders, as well as virtual machine guest management. This talk will discuss how to implement an application that uses SCHED_DEADLINE as well various issues that one must cope with. This scheduling class is rather new to Linux and still has some issues left to solve. Those will also be discussed as well as some ways to work around those issues.

Speakers
avatar for Steven Rostedt

Steven Rostedt

Principal Software Engineer, Red Hat
Steven Rostedt currently works for Red Hat on their Real Time team. He's the maintainer of the stable releases for the Real Time patch (PREEMPT_RT). He is also one of the original developers for the Real Time patch. Steven is the main developer and maintainer for ftrace, the official tracer of the Linux kernel, as well as the user space tools trace-cmd and kernelshark. He also develops ktest.pl (in the kernel) and make localmodconfig.


Thursday October 13, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

09:00

Open Source Development for the ESP8266 and Azure - Ivan Judson, Rita Zhang & Pamela Cortez, Microsoft
Speakers
avatar for Ivan Judson

Ivan Judson

Engineer, Microsoft
Ivan R. Judson, PhD, is a Senior Software Engineer in the Strategic Engagements team at Microsoft. He has worked at Argonne National Laboratory, Montana State University and Workiva in various roles all focused on creating next generation solutions to user problems. Ivan has deep experience in High-Performance Computing, Data Management, Display System Technology, and Networking. He has been work with Linux since Debian 0.91. Ivan is currently... Read More →
avatar for Rita Zhang

Rita Zhang

Open source engineer, Microsoft
Rita Zhang is an open source engineer/architect in San Francisco, working on strategic engagements with customers and partners using emerging open source technologies, and sharing technical collaterals with the open source community. Prior to that, she was an architect at GE delivering features for Industrial internet. During her spare time, she develops new smart home gadgets for her startup http://garagedoorbuddy.com.



Thursday October 13, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

09:00

Power Management Challenges in IoT and How Zephyr RTOS Meets Them - Ramesh Thomas, Intel
An OS that runs on tiny IoT devices is already meeting several challenges. These challenges are due to the limited resources in these devices and the diverse nature of the applications and the ecosystem. These same reasons make adding an effective power management infrastructure extremely complex. These devices that run on tiny batteries for extensive periods, mostly unattended, have a very critical need to conserve power.

Zephyr is a RTOS from Intel, designed for IoT and wearable devices. It is opensource and supports x86, ARM and ARC SoC platforms. It has a small footprint and can run with very less memory. Power management is built in the core of its scheduling and idling design. It exports infrastructure for PM services to implement custom power policies.

This presentation will give an insight into the Zephyr power management design and the philosophies behind it.

Speakers
RT

Ramesh Thomas

Software Engineer, Intel
Ramesh is a software developer at Intel, working on open source projects. He is a key contributor to and maintainer of the power management subsystem in the Zephyr OS. He has also worked extensively in security and virtualization areas.


Thursday October 13, 2016 09:00 - 09:50
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

09:00

Tutorial: Building a Drone, From Scratch - Igor Stoppa, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
Drones are very enticing: they allow to see own programs interact with the physical world.
Beginners usually get attracted by this, but the task can be daunting.

Many tutorials are available, however they either require significant investment in equipment, tools and time, or they lead to building something that is little more than a toy.

This tutorial wants to strike a balance, showing how to design a platform for experimentation, where one can gradually build new functionality and upgrade existing components, yet having some immediate reward from the endeavour.

Key steps explained: defining requirements, sketching an architecture, choosing HW and SW components, debugging and validating the work done.

The experience should be challenging but not frustrating, spiking interest in side topics (ex: motors, electronics, radios) and could be used in a training course on robotics.

Speakers
IS

Igor Stoppa

SW Engineer, OpenSource Technology Center - Intel
Igor is a SW engineer with Intel. In this role, Igor has worked in various fields: test automation, release management, system SW for IoT devices. Before joining Intel, Igor cut his teeth on uC for TLC and Automotive industry, then moved to write kernel power management SW for Nokia Linux phones/Tablets and had an eyes-opening stint as SW release manager. | | In his free time, he likes to travel with his family and to hack on... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 09:00 - 10:50
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

10:00

Anatomy of Cross-Compilation Toolchains - Thomas Petazzoni, Free Electrons
All embedded Linux developers use cross-compilation toolchains as part of their daily work. However, few of them really understand precisely what it is, what it contains, how it is organized, how it is created, and the numerous variants and configurations of available cross-compilation toolchains (different ABIs, FPUs, versions, etc.).

Through this talk, we will dissect cross-compilation toolchains, identify the different components, discuss the build process of a cross-compilation toolchain, and the different configuration options and how they affect the user of the cross-compilation toolchain.

Speakers
avatar for Thomas Petazzoni

Thomas Petazzoni

CTO and Embedded Linux Engineer, Free Electrons
Thomas Petazzoni is CTO and embedded Linux engineer at Free Electrons. He contributes to the support of Marvell ARM processors in the Linux kernel, and is a major contributor to the Buildroot embedded Linux build system. As part of his Buildroot work, Thomas has done extensive contributions to the code building cross-compilation toolchains and the code importing existing cross-compilation toolchains in Buildroot.


Thursday October 13, 2016 10:00 - 10:50
Hall Berlin E - Ground Level

10:00

Continuous Integration and Autotest Environment Using Fuego - Kenji Tadano & Kengo Ibe, Mitsubishi Electric
LTSI (Long Time Support Initiative) launched a Jenkins-based Test Automation Project: "Fuego". In ELCE 2015, we have presented it that is known as "LTSI Test Project" at that time, and shared how to customize the framework. Now Fuego is also used in AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) project and get more attention from many developers. To develop stable commercial products rapidly, it is necessary to have a common environment that can be used for testing and releasing Linux kernel automatically. We are developing such an environment using Fuego. Also, we sorted out how to utilize OSS test suites such as LTP on Fuego for ensuring the quality. To use Fuego effectively, we will share how to develop continuous integration and autotest environment and utilize OSS test suites, based on our experience.

Speakers
KI

kengo ibe

Mitsubishi Electric
Kengo Ibe has been working in Mitsubishi Electric corp. as a Software Engineer since 2012. He is jointing LTSI (Long Term Support Initiative) and AGL (Automotive Grade Linux) of Linux Foundation projects.


Thursday October 13, 2016 10:00 - 10:50
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

10:00

Introduction to Memory Management in Linux - Matt Porter, Konsulko
All modern non-microcontroller CPUs contain a memory management unit and utilize the concept of virtual memory. This presentation will describe the different types of virtual memory spaces and mappings used in the Linux kernel, the cases in which they are useful, how they are implemented in the kernel, and how they differ from user space memory. Concepts such as the hardware memory-management unit (MMU) and translation lookaside buffer (TLB) will be discussed, as well as software concepts like kernel page tables. User space concepts such as growable stacks, memory paging, memory mapping, page faults, exceptions, and other memory-related conditions will be covered as well.

Speakers
avatar for Matt Porter

Matt Porter

CTO, Konsulko
Matt Porter is the CTO of Konsulko Group. At Konsulko, he works on design and development of software for the Linux kernel and other FOSS projects. Matt has contributed to a number of Linux related projects over his years of community involvement including the various part of the kernel, Debian, RapidIO, Beagleboard.org, and many others. Matt is currently working on GPGPU and eBPF hacks for Linux. Matt has spoken at previous Embedded Linux... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 10:00 - 10:50
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

10:00

Trying to Explain the 'Incomprehensible' Decision Making Process of a Subsystem Maintainer - Wolfram Sang, Renesas
To the outside world, decisions of Kernel maintainers may be hard to grasp sometimes. Why is this patch reviewed first? Why don't I get an answer to my questions? How can this take so long? Trying to bring some transparency to these questions, I'll demonstrate on what factors my reasoning is based on for the I2C subsystem. I'll show in what ways the views of a developer and of a maintainer differ (I am a developer, too). And what really helps if you want to get your patches upstream more easily.

Speakers
WS

Wolfram Sang

Kernel Developer, Consultant
Wolfram Sang has been working as a Linux kernel developer for embedded systems since 2008. He maintains the I2C subsystem and works as a consultant, mainly for the Renesas Upstream Kernel Team. Programming since his childhood, he still hacks his machines from the 80s, especially the C64. When not using computers, he is interested in ecological topics, likes cooking and tries to keep his Japanese alive. He has spoken at various conferences like... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 10:00 - 10:50
Salon 7 - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

10:00

How to Develop the ARM 64bit Board, Samsung TM2 with Exynos5433 - Chanwoo Choi & Seung-Woo Kim, Samsung Electronics
In the last period of twenty years ARM has been undisputed leader for processor's architecture in the embedded and mobile industry. With its 64 bit platform, ARM widens up its field of applicability. The ARMv8 introduces a new register set, it is compatible with its 32 bit predecessor ARMv7 and suits best those system that try to be amongst the high end performance devices. Tizen OS (tizen.org) is an open multi profile platform that can run on TV, mobile, cars and wearables. Samsung TM2 board based on Exynos5433, which patches has been recently posted to mainline, is an ARM 64bit board supported by Tizen 64bit. However, during the bring-up, the kernel developers have faced many challenges that will be presented in this session. The presentation will go through a number of issues and the way they have been solved in order to make Tizen run on a 64 bit platform.

Speakers
avatar for Chanwoo Choi

Chanwoo Choi

Linux Kernel Engineer, Samsung Electronics
Chanwoo has been working in the Linux Kernel over 7 years as a Linux Kernel Maintainer and Developer at Samsung Electronics. He is developing the low-level device driver for Exynos SoC and Power Management. He has been working in open source community as EXTCON and Exynos Clock maintainer.
SK

Seung-Woo Kim

Kernel Engineer, Samsung Electronics
Seung-Woo is working on several sub-systems of Linux kernel including media and drm. He is one of the maintainer of exynos-drm driver. He is currently working on Tizen project from Samsung Electronics.


Thursday October 13, 2016 10:00 - 10:50
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

10:00

The Internet of Things and Life Beyond Linux - Wolfgang Mauerer, Technical University Regensburg/Siemens AG
The Internet of Things (IoT) is quickly becoming an everyday reality -
but will it be an Internet of Linux things? While Linux once used to
run on everything that even remotely resembled a 32 bit computer, the
kernel kept growing during the last decade, and will continue grow.

Despite efforts to trim down the kernel, full Linux stacks will not
never pay off for all IoT devices and scenarios. This need not be a
disadvantage! In this talk, we remind developers that the Linux
ecosystem is much more than just a kernel, and show the benefits of
alternative approaches. We provide use-cases and examples based
on real and virtual systems, and discuss criteria when to choose Linux,
and when to prefer other approaches. Most importantly, we will argue
why other systems should not be treated as competitors, but as friendly
additions to the Linux ecosystem.

Speakers
WM

Wolfgang Mauerer

Professor/Senior Software Architect, Technical University Regensburg/Siemens AG
Wolfgang Mauerer is a senior key expert at Siemens Corporate Research, Corporate Competence Centre Embedded Linux, where he deals with establishing Linux in innovative and demanding industrial areas. He also serves as professor of theoretical computer science at the Technical University Regensburg, and is a member of the technical board of the Linux Foundation's newly founded civil infrastructure platform. His academic research deals with finding... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 10:00 - 10:50
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

10:50

Coffee Break
Thursday October 13, 2016 10:50 - 11:15
Gallery, Level 1

11:15

HDMI CEC: What? Why? How? - Hans Verkuil, Cisco Systems Norway
The HDMI connector features a CEC (Consumer Electronics Control) pin that allows connected devices to detect and control one another. This talk describes what CEC is, why you would want to implement support for it, and how you can use the new kernel framework and API that was introduced in kernel 4.8 to support this HDMI feature. In addition to describing the framework, this presentation will also demonstrate CEC compliance tests that were created to test both your own CEC application code and the CEC implementation of other CEC devices.

Speakers
HV

Hans Verkuil

Senior R&D Software Engineer, Cisco Systems Norway
Hans Verkuil started contributing patches to the MPEG encoder/decoder ivtv driver in early 2004 and it snowballed from there. Since 2013 he is the video4linux co-maintainer responsible for V4L2 bridge drivers and video receivers and transmitters. He lives in Oslo, Norway, working as a senior R&D software engineer at Cisco Systems Norway, developing - surprise! - video4linux drivers.


Thursday October 13, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Hall Berlin E - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

11:15

It's a Hardware Bug and I can Prove It - Kris Chaplin, Altera
The divide between software and hardware is becoming more blurred - especially with programmable hardware. When a bug strikes, we can sometimes be left in doubt as to root cause, and who is to blame! There is more need for visibility to co-debug embedded systems - especially when both hardware and software are being developed concurrently.

In this presentation and live demonstration, Kris Chaplin will show debugging techniques that leave the user in no doubt as to where the issue is - hardware or software. The root cause will be revealed using some simple tools that allow us to literally single step and set common breakpoints not only in software but also hardware!

Speakers
avatar for Kris Chaplin

Kris Chaplin

Embedded Technology Specialist, Intel PSG
Kris is an Embedded Technology Specialist for Intel working with major Military, Industrial and Communications customers in Northern Europe. He has 15 years of experience architecting and bringing up embedded processor systems (soft and hard) running Linux in FPGAs having supported and sold them for both major FPGA vendors. Kris has a BEng(Hons) degree in Electronic Engineering from the University of Southampton.


Thursday October 13, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2
  • Experience Level Any

11:15

Modernizing the NAND Framework: The Big Picture - Boris Brezillon, Free Electrons
The NAND framework has been introduced a long time ago (in Linux 2.4.6) and has organically evolved since then to support new NAND chips and NAND controllers of growing complexity.

While, from a functional point of view, the NAND framework is able to support new NAND controllers and new NAND chips with minimal changes, the way it has been designed prevents code factorization and complexifies the addition of new features like multi-plane and sequential operations or DDR NAND support. Another issue is the lack of separation between the code handling the NAND controller aspects and the NAND chip aspects, which misleads many developers.

After giving an overview of the current architecture of the MTD and NAND subsystems and highlighting its shortcomings, this talk will detail some of the reworks we have already done and are planning to do and how those changes would make NAND controller

Speakers
BB

Boris Brezillon

Free Electrons
Boris joined Free Electrons in 2014, a company offering development, consulting and training services to embedded Linux system developers worldwide. He has been working on embedded systems since 2008, mostly Linux on ARM. Boris contributed to Atmel's at91 SoCs support and a bit to Allwinner's SoCs support.


Thursday October 13, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

11:15

No, It's Never Too Late to Upstream Your Legacy Linux Based Platform - Neil Armstrong, BayLibre
You maintain or used to maintain a Linux based board or SoC off-tree ? Then there are plenty of reasons for you to push your changes to the mainline Linux. Some will say it’s too late, or too complex, or too expensive but the long-term benefits of regular upstreaming truly outpass these constraints especially it you have the right methods. In this presentation Neil will elaborate on this question.

Neil will then expose the various challenges about code upstreaming, like time constraints, copyright issues and the community aspect of the work. For example, vendor GPL code is generally lying on an obscure github repo, or in a hardly reachable tarball.

In parallel, Neil will present practical tips to easier your day to day upstream work and explicit this simple rule : the fastest the maximum patches are upstreamed, the less work you’ll have to actually maintain the port in the future.

Speakers
avatar for Neil Armstrong

Neil Armstrong

Embedded Linux Software Engineer, BayLibre
Embedded Linux Engineer since 2008, Neil worked on designing and supporting small in-house designed SoCs for Digital TV Content Protection, Set-Top-Box or Security Co-Processor, and is now Embedded Linux Expert in the Baylibre team. He ports, maintains and upstreams Linux support for ARM/ARM64 based SoCs from basic system support, power management to multimedia drivers. Neil experienced technical presentations during his engineering studies and... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Salon 7 - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

11:15

Creating Bluetooth-Based IoT Solutions with Zephyr - Johan Hedberg, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
The Zephyr OS comes with rich connectivity support, including a highly customizable Bluetooth 4.2 compliant stack supporting Bluetooth Low Energy (aka Bluetooth Smart). The stack is also ready to take on the Bluetooth 5 specification coming out in 2016, enabling e.g. Mesh Networking.

The presentation will cover the current status of Bluetooth support in Zephyr and what lies ahead. It'll also describe how the Bluetooth subsystem integrates with the Zephyr IPv6/6LoWPAN stack to make IPv6 over Bluetooth Smart possible. The presentation will also give an overview of how to write Bluetooth applications for Zephyr, including the ability to utilize a Linux host with Bluetooth support combined with qemu for rapid prototyping. The presentation will also explain how to create a fully Open Source solution from the BLE controller firmware up to the Zephyr application on Intel Curie-based boards.

Speakers
JH

Johan Hedberg

Senior Software Engineer, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
I've been hacking on Linux for many years, both on my free time and professionally. I spent many years working on the Maemo and MeeGo projects at Nokia, and for the past five years my employer has been the Open Source Technology Center at Intel. I'm a maintainer for the Linux kernel Bluetooth subsystem and the BlueZ project, as well as the architect & lead developer for Bluetooth on Zephyr. I've presented at various Linux Foundation... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

11:15

JavaScript Meets Zephyr - Sakari Poussa, Intel

Programming should be fun and easy, right? Developers should spend their time in creating innovative solutions, not on board issues and tools setup. JavaScript is one of the most popular scripting languages. It is easy to learn and fast to develop with. With new Zephyr JavaScript Runtime developers can use JavaScript to create Zephyr applications. Based on JerryScript, the Node.js like Zephyr JavaScript Runtime provides access to Zephyr APIs (via bindings) including BLE, GPIO, PWM, OCF and many more in the future. JavaScript development on Zephyr is also fast, you don’t need to compile, link, flash or reboot, just copy and run. Believe or not, you can do all this with Arduino 101 which contains only 384K ROM and 80 K RAM. Join this presentation to learn more, and how to contribute. Yes, it is an open source project!


Speakers
avatar for Sakari Poussa

Sakari Poussa

Software Architect, Intel
Sakari Poussa is a software architect in Intel’s Open Source Technology Center located in Espoo, Finland, leading web and IoT technology development. Previous to joining Intel, Sakari | directed the software engineering efforts of Nokia’s Linux-based mobile operating systems (Maemo and MeeGo) for the popular N900 and N9 device series. At Intel, Sakari has been | working on open source projects including Tizen and Crosswalk web runtime... Read More →



Thursday October 13, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

11:15

Using Greybus for IoT - Alexandre Bailon, BayLibre
Greybus is a RPC like protocol on top UniPro bus that has been designed for the Project ARA. The Project ARA aim to develop a modular smartphone.
Greybus gives the ability to the host to control remotely the buses (such as i2c or spi) of the modules.
After spending some time on project ARA, Alexandre Bailon though that it would be awesome to use it outside of project ARA, as a general purpose protocol.
So he updated Greybus to work with TCP/IP (instead of UniPro) in order to use it for IoT.
He will give an overview of the Greybus protocol, explain how to use it and
he will present the benefits to use it for IoT as well the cons.

Speakers
AB

Alexandre Bailon

Software Engineer, BayLibre
Alexandre Bailon is a co-founder of BayLibre, an embedded Linux consultancy, where he has developed USB gadget support for Google’s Project Ara modular phone. Before co-founding BayLibre, Alex worked at Texas Instruments hacking on the Linux kernel scheduler, memory management and GPU drivers for the OMAP application processor.


Thursday October 13, 2016 11:15 - 12:05
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

12:15

Clinging to Clang - Khem Raj, Comcast RDK
Clang is rapidly developing into a viable static compiler for Embedded Linux ecosystem. As Clang gets support for more and more architectures, it is becoming a very interesting alternative for opensource static compilers on Embedded Linux. The modern design of LLVM and Clang infrastructure enables rapid prototying and tool development on top of LLVM, which is unfolding a lot of sophisticated tools in Clang suite e.g. Clang-tidy, pp-trace, Address and memory sanitizers, static analysis tools and so on. This talk will explain the Clang/LLVM tools in details and its usecases and advantages in Embedded Linux. Above all it will introduce Clang as C/C++ cross-compiler for embedded Linux Development and its integration with Yocto project and how it can be used with Yocto Project's Extended SDK. It will also cover the strong points and differences of Clang code generations vis-a-vis GCC

Speakers
KR

Khem Raj

Principle Linux Architect, Comcast RDK
Working on deploying Yocto Project/OpenEmbedded into Comcast's community Reference Design Kit for STB and designing open source software development and contribution procedures. Previously worked at Juniper where he was responsible to creating and maintaining Linux base operating system for upcoming Junos( Juniper's Network Operating System) again it was based on Yocto project. He is a contributor and maintainer for pieces in OpenEmbedded and... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Hall Berlin E - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

12:15

Continuous Integration and Testing of a Yocto Project Based Automotive Head Unit - Mario Domenech Goulart & Mikko Rapeli, BMW
Cars these days are shipped with a lot of software, and some of them are based on Linux and Yocto Project. In this talk, Mario Domenech Goulart and Mikko Rapeli explain some of the solutions and challenges of setting up and running a Continuous Integration and Testing system in a large automotive development project based on Yocto Project. The talk will cover aspects like source code management, SDK, multiphase CI, Jenkins, Yocto Project build tuning and test automation.

Speakers
MD

Mario Domenech Goulart

Software Developer, BMW Car IT
MR

Mikko Rapeli

SW Developer, BMW Car IT
GNU/Linux, Debian, yocto, bitbake, Linux kernel, git, Jenkins, mcfrisk @freenode


Thursday October 13, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

12:15

Solving Devicetree Issues, part 3.0- Frank Rowand, Sony
Using devicetree is painful. The framework does not help to develop correct system descriptions (device tree source) and drivers. Errors are often not visible or are hard to understand. But tools and process to make device tree easier to use are being added to Linux. This session will present new tools and techniques that have recently arrived in mainline or are under active development. This iis the third chapter of an ongoing story.

This talk covers different material than the first two chapters. For reference,

The first chapter is available at http://elinux.org/Device_Tree_frowand and the second chapter will be available after LinuxCon Japan at http://elinux.org/Device_Tree_presentations_papers_articles

Speakers
avatar for Frank Rowand

Frank Rowand

Sony
Frank has meddled in the internals of several proprietary operating systems, but has been loyal to the Linux kernel since 1999. He has worked in many areas of technology, including performance, networking, platform support, drivers, real-time, and embedded. Frank has shown poor judgement by agreeing to be one of the devicetree maintainers. Frank is currently an open source and free software advocate at Sony. Frank has presented at many Linux... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

12:15

Update on Shared Logging between the Kernel and the Bootloader - Sean Hudson, Mentor Graphics, Inc
This presentation provides an update to my presentation at last year's ELCE on the current status of the shared logging feature between the bootloader and the kernel. During this talk, I will review the history of the shared logging feature. Next, I will share the challenges encountered. Lastly, I will highlight remaining challenges and then conclude with a quick, live demonstration of the feature.

Speakers
avatar for Sean Hudson

Sean Hudson

Embedded Linux Architect & Member of Technical Staff, Mentor Graphics, Inc
I am an embedded Linux architect at Mentor Graphics. I have worked on embedded devices since 1996 and with embedded Linux since 2006. Most notably, I have been involved with the Yocto Project since it's public announcement in 2010, have served on the YP Advisory Board for two different companies, and am currently a member of the OpenEmbedded Board.



Thursday October 13, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Salon 7 - Ground Level

12:15

BlueZ Meets Zephyr - Luiz Augusto von Dentz, Intel
With Bluetooth being a common choice for interconnecting IoT devices, both Linux and Zephyr will have to interoperate. In this presentation, Luiz Von Dentz will explain how the Zephyr Bluetooth stack benefits from Linux BlueZ stack, sharing tools and developers, creating a great synergy for the communities involved. The presentation will focus on the many tools available for Linux and how they can speed up developing and testing of new solutions and ultimately improving their time to market.

Speakers
avatar for Luiz Augusto von Dentz

Luiz Augusto von Dentz

Senior Linux Engineer, Intel
Luiz is a Senior Software Engineer at Intel, Finland. He is a Bluetooth specialist and maintainer of Linux and Zephyr Bluetooth stacks. In this role he is responsible for for patch reviewing, software architecture and implementation of Bluetooth related features.


Thursday October 13, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Salon 4+5 London - Ground Level

12:15

Cloud Platforms for the Internet of Things: How Do They Stack Up? - Koustabh Dolui, Politecnico di Milano
With the advent of the Internet of Things (IoT), there has been a recent surge in the number of cloud platforms offering their services for data collection and processing from IoT devices. These platforms, open-source and closed, are diverse in terms of ease of use, architecture, data storage, privacy, security and communication protocols. However, how these cloud platforms measure up against each other, given the set of tradeoffs that they present, remains quite unexplored in existing literature. In this presentation, Koustabh will present a detailed study on the architecture that these platforms are based on and how the open source platforms compare against closed platforms. Koustabh will compare the platforms based on a real data-set generated from a sensor network deployed at the heritage site of Circo Massimo, Rome, as a part of an ongoing project at Politecnico di Milano, Italy.

Speakers
avatar for Koustabh Dolui

Koustabh Dolui

Masters Student, Politecnico di Milano
Koustabh Dolui is a masters student in Telecommunications Engineering, at Politecnico di Milano, Italy. He is currently working on his thesis on the 'Internet of Things' under his guide prof. Luca Mottola. He is passionate about embedded systems, cyber-physical systems, sensor networks and IoT as well. Koustabh is currently working on assessing various platforms for storage and analysis of data generated by the IoT devices and how the platforms... Read More →



Thursday October 13, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

12:15

Enabling IoT OSs for Intel Quark MCU platforms: The Fast Way - Andre Guedes, Intel
The IoT wave has brought several software stacks such as Zephyr, Contiki, RIOT, Mynewt, and OpenThread which implement key IoT requirements. To enable these stacks on new hardware, developers must have a deep understanding of SoC details (e.g. how to configure and manage I/O controllers), demanding a high learning curve. Recently, Intel released QMSI, an Open Source project, which provides several features such as device drivers libraries, linker scripts, bootstrap code, and newlib syscalls. That functionality can be easily reused in order to fast enable Intel Quark MCU support on IoT-driven software stacks. This talk aims to provide an overview on the QMSI project, discuss how Zephyr and Contiki OSs are currently integrating with QMSI, and how other software stacks can reuse it to leverage Intel Quark MCU platforms support.

Speakers
AG

Andre Guedes

Software Engineer, Intel
Andre Guedes is a software developer with background in embedded systems, device drivers, Linux kernel, and connectivity technologies. Currently, he is working on enabling IoT software stacks on Intel Quark MCU platforms. He is an active contributor to the QMSI and Zephyr OS projects and has developed the Contiki OS port for Galileo and Quark D2000 platforms. Also, he is a former contributor to the BlueZ project and has spoken on events such as... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 12:15 - 13:05
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

13:05

14:30

C++ for Embedded Development - Thiago Macieira, Intel
Traditional development lore says that software development for constrained devices requires writing code in C, as applications written with C++ will always be bigger, require more resources and will run slower than their C counterparts. Nothing could be farther from the truth. While it is true that many C++ applications are big and demand a lot of resources, that is not a limitation of the language itself. This session will begin by giving the motivation of why C++ would be interesting in constrained-device development: it will briefly discuss what features of the language may make software safer and how such software can be even more efficient than those written in C. The presenter will then explain what aspects of the language developers should be specially aware of are and will provide information for developers to be able to develop their software in C++, without undue cost.

Speakers
avatar for Thiago Macieira

Thiago Macieira

Intel
Thiago Macieira holds a double degree in Engineering and an MBA. He has been involved in several Open Source projects for over 15 years and is an experienced C++ developer, having spent the better part of the last 10 years developing Qt and Qt-based software. In the last two years, he's also been working closely with C++ committee members in discussing and improving the suggestions for upcoming language features. He has been involved with many... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Hall Berlin E - Ground Level

14:30

GPIO for Engineers and Makers - Linus Walleij
We will go over the changes to the GPIO subsystem in the recent years, including GPIO descriptor refactoring, new support for things like open drain, some words on device tree and ACPI hardware descriptions, and we will discuss the new userspace character device ABI for GPIO chips and how usecases such as those presented by the maker community or industrial control clients can benefit from it. We will also talk a bit about the future direction of the subsystem.

Speakers
avatar for Linus Walleij

Linus Walleij

Engineer, Linaro Limited
Linus Walleij is a kernel developer at Linaro working on various embedded ARM systems, and a subsystem maintainer for the GPIO and pin control subsystems. Apart from the Linux kernel he works on libmtp and Fedora packages in his spare time.


Thursday October 13, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

14:30

kvmtool - A QEMU Alternative? - Andre Przywara, ARM
kvmtool started out as lean, hacker-friendly alternative to QEMU for driving KVM virtual machines, living in the tools directory of the kernel tree. At ARM it was and is used as an early enablement vehicle for testing new KVM kernel features. Now as the tool has been separated from the kernel tree and lives in its own, independent repository, wider interest has sparked to use it in more production like scenarios , for instance in the hope to use less host resources. The presentation will first give an overview about kvmtool, showing the differences and similarities to QEMU. It also looks at how kvmtool performs in terms of resource usage and what obstacles it still needs to overcome to become more useful.

Speakers
AP

Andre Przywara

ARM
Andre Przywara works in the ARM Linux kernel team in Cambridge/UK, primarily on KVM, but also on other parts of the kernel. Recent work included extending the virtualization support for the ARM interrupt controller and helping with Linux support for the Pine64 board. Before joining ARM Andre spent a year in an early-bird ARM server company, while being assigned to the Linaro group. He gained much experience and knowledge in Linux, KVM, QEMU and... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Salon 7 - Ground Level

14:30

Using the Network as a Reliable Platform for Time-Sensitive Systems - Henrik Austad, Cisco
Time Sensitive Networking (TSN) is a set of open standards that govern the configuration and hardware requirement for a network in order to provide transmission guarantees for traffic streams.

Audio-Video Bridging (AVB) is but one of the many possible applications to place on top of TSN, allowing a system to connect multiple media-devices over the network as if they had a local, physical connection. Not only does this simplify large installations, it also opens up a whole new set of possibilities for how media systems can be created both professional, in homes or as infotainment-systems in cars.

This talk will dive into what TSN actually is, what it can provide and its benefits and finally what is currently missing in the kernel to support TSN.

Speakers
avatar for Henrik Austad

Henrik Austad

Software Engineer, Cisco Systems
Henrik received his Master's in Engineering Cybernetics at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology in Trondheim. Since then, he has worked as a web front- and back-end developer, architecting internal systems for malware analysis. Currently doing Linux kernel real-time performance profiling and tuning, low-level audio development and lately, driving the TSN development effort at Cisco Lysaker.


Thursday October 13, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

14:30

Quark Microcontroller Software Interface - Malcolm Prinn, Intel
Quark Microcontroller Software Interface (QMSI) (Malcolm Prinn, Intel®) - The Intel® Quark™ microcontroller family currently consists of Quark™ D2000 and SE, which are low power, battery-operated, 32-bit x86 based microcontrollers aimed at IoT edge devices. These operate at 32 MHz and include integrated non-volatile memory, SRAM and various peripherals (SPI, I2C, etc...). In this presentation Malcolm will introduce the current MCU capabilities and specifications, Intel®’s MCU stack and QMSI, a hardware abstraction layer (HAL) that will be common to the Quark™ MCU family. QMSI is an Open Source project released on GitHub as a 01.org project in December 2015, and was released under a BSD license. Included in the HAL are, a bootloader with Firmware Update features, peripheral drivers and DSP libraries (fixed floating point operations, fast math, etc...).

Speakers
avatar for Malcolm Prinn

Malcolm Prinn

Intel
Malcolm is a firmware developer at Intel corporation. He is currently working on developing an open source hardware abstraction layer for the Intel® Quark™ MCU family, and has presented before at SMART 2014, The Third International Conference on Smart Systems, Devices and Technologies.


Thursday October 13, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

14:30

Security in IoT, More an Attitude Issue than a Technical Challenge - Dominig ar Foll, Intel Open Source
One of the main blocker toward IoT adoption outide of the entousiast domain, is security. This is quite sad as simple measures, if applied at the design level would most often cover adequatility the risks. The presentation will describe the typical security risk that most IoT application will need to provide cover for, and what Open Source solution could be applied as implementation.

Speakers
avatar for Dominig ar Foll

Dominig ar Foll

Senior Software Architect, Intel Open Source
Dominig Ar Foll (Dominique Le Foll) holds a Master degree in Computer Science from the Military School ESAT in Paris. He started as a research engineer during ten years before joining the Telecom Industry. Dominig has won several patents in Europe, US and Asia and regularly talk in international conferences. His experience in the securitisation of pay TV service has lead him to work on the security extensions for Meego TV and Tizen IVI. He... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 14:30 - 15:20
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

15:30

Debugging Methodologies for Realtime Issues in Linux Systems - Joel Fernandes, Amazon
This session will walk the audience through some common scenarios where latencies hit an embedded linux system causing loss of real-time performance that the embedded system expects. I will share experiences using Linux based latency tracing and deep system tracing tools and show how to use them. I will also share some methodologies such as instrumentation techniques and dynamic probing to detect problems. Lastly we will go through scheduler statistics which may indicate processes in a system that are suffering from higher latencies and how to use them.

Speakers
avatar for Joel Fernandes

Joel Fernandes

Joel has worked on several domains in Embedded Systems software and hardware at both SoC vendors and OEMs alike. He has deep knowledge and understanding of Linux device drivers and kernel architecture and blogs about these at LinuxInternals.org. At his day job at Amazon, he actively pursues performance issues affecting Amazon's line of consumer electronic products which affect millions of lives everyday.


Thursday October 13, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Salon 7 - Ground Level
  • Experience Level Any

15:30

FDO: Magic 'Make My Program Faster' Compilation Option? - Pawel Moll, ARM
Feedback Driven Optimisation (FDO), also known as Profile Guided Optimisation (PGO) is a well known code optimisation technique, employed by compilers since mid XX century, yet not widely used in the wild these days. It relies on providing runtime-captured information about code execution (eg. "branch taken or not?") during next code compilation, improving quality of decisions made by compiler heuristics.

To be fair, there were good reasons for its demise which I hope to discuss, mainly time and complexity overhead and deployment difficulties, but there is some hope on the horizon, coming with new approach, called AutoFDO and originating at Google, based on statistical profiling (namely Linux perf + extra tools) and source code level attribution. I'll discuss existing support for it available in mainline GCC and LLVM and give examples of real-life, successful deployments.

Speakers
avatar for Pawel Moll

Pawel Moll

Principal Engineer, ARM
I've worked with so called "embedded Linux" for more then ten years now, currently for ARM in Cambridge, UK as a Principal Engineer, with main focus on Linux developer tools, in all possible form and shape. My recent interest include performance analysis and optimisation. Every now and then I also act as a trainer on ARM software courses, write developer articles and give technical talks (including many LinuxCon Europe and ELC-E conferences).


Thursday October 13, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Hall Berlin E - Ground Level

15:30

Knocking at Your Back Door (or How Dealing with Modern Interrupt Architectures can Affect Your Sanity) - Marc Zyngier, ARM Ltd
Interrupts used to be simple: a wire that a device would shake when something happened, and to which the CPU would respond. Those were the days when all you had to know was whether the signal was edge or level. Things became more interesting with cascading interrupt controllers, fast EOI, shadow controllers, MSIs and translation tables. You quickly realize that dealing with interrupts has become quite complex.



Over the past couple of years, the interrupt subsystem in Linux has evolved to support these dramatic changes in the landscape, allowing basic functionalities such as irqdomain and irqchip to be assembled into hierarchies in order to represent the complexity of the hardware (and put it to good use). This presentation will go over these evolutions, how the Linux kernel handles them, and what it means for the hacker putting together the support for a new platform.

Speakers
avatar for Marc Zyngier

Marc Zyngier

Software Engineer, ARM Ltd
Marc Zyngier has been toying with the Linux kernel since 1993, and has been involved over time with the RAID subsystem (MD) and all kinds of obsolete architectures (by maintaining the EISA bus). He also messed with consumer electronics, and now co-maintains KVM on ARM(64) as well as some of the IRQ infrastructure (irqchip, irqdomain).


Thursday October 13, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

15:30

Open-Source Tools for FPGA Development - Marek Vašut, DENX Software Engineering
Programmable hardware is becoming increasingly popular in the recent years, yet the software tools for working with such programmable hardware are dominated by closed-source proprietary solutions. This is now changing. In this presentation, Marek will summarize the open-source tools for working with programmable hardware, like "icestorm", "vtr", "ghdl" and "iverilog". Marek will show how to use the open-source tools to produce a working design and explain the benefits and limitations of such solutions. At the end of the talk, Marek will outline the process of implementing such tools to demonstrate why this is so much effort.

Speakers
avatar for Marek Vašut

Marek Vašut

Contractor, DENX Software Engineering
I have been contracting for DENX Software Engineering for a couple of years now. My primary responsibility is designing and implementing customer specific functionality. One important aspect of my work is leveraging the benefits of working inside the mainline Linux, U-Boot and Yocto projects, explaining our customers the benefits of pushing the newly produced code back into mainline and effectively doing the contributions. I am therefore... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Salon 21 Dublin - Level 2

15:30

Creating Memory Efficient and High Performance IP Stack for Zephyr OS - Jukka Rissanen, Open Source Technology Center, Intel
The Zephyr OS is for small and embedded devices which have limited memory and processing power but have IP network connectivity.

Typically there is no dynamic memory in these devices and all the memory must be allocated statically beforehand. This makes it difficult to utilize memory best possible way when network packets are sent or received. Zephyr OS IP stack handles this problem by allocating memory pool of small network buffers optimized for used network bearer type. The network buffers are then linked together to store bigger network packets.

In order to get best network data handling performance, it is possible in certain cases to use zero copy when transferring or receiving data from the network. This is done by pre-allocating space for the link layer headers and partitioning the data so that there is no need to copy network data between different parts of the Zephyr OS.

Speakers
JR

Jukka Rissanen

Intel
Jukka Rissanen, Intel Open Source Technology Center. Jukka is a Senior Software Developer at Intel Open Source Technology Center. He is currently developing and maintaining IP connectivity infrastructure in Zephyr OS.


Thursday October 13, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Salon 2+3 Rom - Ground Level

15:30

How to Prototype an IoT Hardware with IoTivity on GNU/Linux - Phil Coval, Samsung
IoTivity is an open source software framework enabling seamless device-to-device connectivity to address the emerging needs of the Internet of Things. In this presentation, Philippe will try explain how to use it in very practical approach. Expect minimal C++ examples to be explained in details to let you create your own DIY IoT device from scratch. Note this presentation will tend to be OS agnostic but might be focused on a generic GNU/Linux system. Some demonstrations will be shown on Tizen or Yocto based systems (AGL, GENIVI and more), on various hardware (RaspberryPi, MinnowBoard, or ARTIK ..,).

Keep in touch : https://wiki.iotivity.org/community

Speakers
avatar for Phil Coval

Phil Coval

Software Engineer, Samsung
Philippe Coval is a FLOSS enthusiast since late 1990s, since and now belongs to Samsung Open Source Group. Or course, he still actively supports community contributions by trying to help anyone who has interest about Free software or open hardware generally and Tizen or IoTivity in particular


Thursday October 13, 2016 15:30 - 16:20
Salon 1 Moskau - Ground Level

16:20

Coffee Break
Thursday October 13, 2016 16:20 - 16:40
Gallery, Level 1

16:40

Keynote: Zephyr & IoT Security - Geoff Thorpe, Head of IoT Security, NXP Semiconductor
Description TBD

Speakers
GT

Geoff Thorpe

Head of IoT Security, NXP Semiconductor, Microcontrollers


Thursday October 13, 2016 16:40 - 17:00
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

17:00

Keynote: Status of Embedded Linux - Tim Bird, ELC Program Chair
In this talk, Tim will discuss recent developments in the Linux kernel that are of interest to embedded developers. He will cover key areas that have historically plagued embedded developers, such as boot time, system size, realtime, power management and security.  He will also talk about the successes Linux has had in recent years in different embedded markets, as well as ongoing challenges for using Linux in embedded systems.

Speakers
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engineer, Sony Corporation
Tim Bird is a Senior Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. This group seeks to improve Linux for use in consumer electronics products. In this position, Tim directs technical initiatives, and encourages companies to participate in the open source community. Tim has been working... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 17:00 - 17:20
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level

17:20

Closing Game
Speakers
avatar for Tim Bird

Tim Bird

Senior Software Engineer, Sony Corporation
Tim Bird is a Senior Software Engineer for Sony Corporation, where he helps Sony improve the Linux kernel for use in Sony's products. Tim is also the Chair of the Architecture Group of the CE Working Group of the Linux Foundation. This group seeks to improve Linux for use in consumer electronics products. In this position, Tim directs technical initiatives, and encourages companies to participate in the open source community. Tim has been working... Read More →


Thursday October 13, 2016 17:20 - 18:00
Hall Berlin A - Ground Level